Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Liverpool Launches £20 million Project to Develop Medicines for Children

07.12.2006
A £20 million Department of Health programme to develop medicines specifically for use in children will be launched jointly by the University of Liverpool and the Royal Liverpool Children’s NHS Trust (Alder Hey) tomorrow (Thursday, 7 December).

The initiative involves the establishment of a national research network to undertake important clinical studies into the safety and effectiveness of medicines for children. A consortium led by the University of Liverpool acts as the co-ordinating centre for the network, based at the Institute of Child Health at Alder Hey.

Many of the medicines used to treat children have been designed for adults and have not been properly tested on the young. Health professionals use their skill and judgement when prescribing medicines for the young but need better information from studies conducted with children to inform these decisions.

Andy Burnham, Minister of Delivery and Quality for the Department of Heath, who will formally launch the project tomorrow, said: “The Government is committed to making the UK the best place in the world for medical research and will invest over £750 million this year.

“Establishing the Medicines for Children Research Network will ensure that children benefit directly from the latest medical advances and treatments designed, developed and licensed specifically for their use.

"By bringing together the research expertise of the University of Liverpool and the world renowned children's care at Alder Hey, this initiative is a significant boost to Liverpool - putting it at the forefront of research of children's medicines in this country.”

Professor Sally C. Davies, Director General of R&D at the Department of Health said:

"This unique achievement will drive partnerships between the NHS and its young patients with top class researchers and with funding from the public, commercial and charitable sectors to meet the very specific needs of children across the entire range of health care and services. Our children are entitled to the same standards of treatment as adults and the MCRN will place this important issue at the heart of the national research effort."

The Medicines for Children Research Network (MCRN) is one of six topic-specific Research Networks which form a part of the UK Clinical Research Network, an initiative funded by the Department of Health to strengthen and facilitate clinical research across the UK with the aim of improving the quality, speed and coordination of research.

The network involves all types of health professionals, the pharmaceutical industry and most importantly, children and parents, who are helping to develop new medicines. A Young Person’s Advisory Group has been established which comprises 17 young people aged from nine to 18 who have been recruited through schools and youth organisations in Liverpool.

The group, which has named itself ‘Stand Up, Speak Up!’, will develop an understanding of the project and learn about the role of medicines in the promotion of good health.

They will work with project leaders on publicity material for children about the initiative and will act as ambassadors to encourage young people receiving medical care to participate in research projects.

Rosalind Smyth, Professor of Paediatric Medicine and director of the co-ordinating centre said: “This is the most important development towards improving children’s health that has happened during my professional career. We now have - in partnership with the pharmaceutical industry and other organisations that fund medical research - a real opportunity to provide medicines which will be of specific benefit to children.”

The MCRN will enable the development of a wide variety of drugs for children, including those for the prevention and treatment of diseases affecting newborns and children requiring intensive care. Researchers are developing treatments for a range of diseases in children such as meningitis, asthma, epilepsy and migraine.

The work of the MCRN is being undertaken by six Local Research Networks (LRNs), in England which will liaise with similar groups in the rest of the UK. These include more than 150 hospitals and Primary Care Trusts. University researchers are working jointly with the Trusts on drug development.

The Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital has been appointed as the host institution for the Cheshire, Merseyside & North Wales LRN, with Dr Matthew Peak and Dr Jo Blair as co-directors and Dr Charlie Orton as manager.

A £20 million grant will support the MCRN over five years and help to establish a world-class health service infrastructure to support clinical research and embed good clinical practice and quality in all clinical trials.

The MCRN has been developed in collaboration with the University of Liverpool; the Royal Liverpool Children’s Hospital; Imperial College, London; the Liverpool Women’s Hospital; the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford and the National Children’s Bureau. It will be launched at Alder Hey on Thursday, 7 December.

Joanna Robotham | alfa
Further information:
http://www.liv.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology
07.12.2016 | Nanyang Technological University

nachricht How to turn white fat brown
07.12.2016 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

The balancing act: An enzyme that links endocytosis to membrane recycling

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences

How to turn white fat brown

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>