Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Important factors in compliance with HIV regimens identified

21.11.2006
Adherence to HIV medications is the greatest predictor of death. How well patients with HIV adhere to their regimens of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) medication depends on a variety of factors, either positive or negative, many of which are common to patients around the world.

In a systematic review of previously published studies researchers, Edward Mills and colleagues, looked at studies in both developed and developing country settings which had examined the factors that affect adherence to these regimens.

84 relevant studies were examined of which 37 used “qualitative” methods (focus groups, interviews, open-ended questioning) and 47 used “quantitative” methods (surveys). Only 12 of the studies had been carried out in the developing world.

Many barriers to adherence were common to both developed and developing settings, including fear of disclosure of HIV status, concomitant substance abuse, forgetfulness, suspicions of treatment, regimens that were too complicated, number of pills required, decreased quality of life, and work and family responsibilities. Factors unique to the studies conducted in the developing world included financial constraints and problems with traveling to get access to treatment.

Important facilitators (factors that made adherence easier) reported by patients in developed nation settings included having a sense of self-worth, seeing positive effects of antiretroviral drugs, acceptance of HIV status, understanding of the need for strict adherence, making use of reminder tools, and having a simple regimen. No facilitators to adherence were discussed in any study in a developing nation setting.

The authors conclude that “clinicians should use this information to engage in open discussion with patients to promote adherence and identify barriers and facilitators within their own populations”. However, they note that in developing country settings, “the reliability of medication access is an important adherence barrier that individuals have little opportunity to facilitate. Patient-level adherence can be determined only when a steady supply of medication exists.”

Citation: Mills EJ, Nachega JB, Bangsberg DR, Singh S, Rachlis B, et al. (2006) Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: A systematic review of developed and developing nation patient-reported barriers and facilitators. PLoS Med 3(11): e438.

CONTACT:
Curtis Cooper, MD, FRCPC
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of Ottawa
Division of Infectious Diseases
The Ottawa Hospital, Canada
+1-613-737-8924 (office)
+1-613-737-8164 (fax)
ccooper@Ottawahospital.on.ca

Andrew Hyde | alfa
Further information:
http://www.plosmedicine.org
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030438

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials
14.12.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>