Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Women show 47% greater persistence with osteoporosis drugs if offered monthly tablet plus support

20.07.2006
Women who took an osteoporosis drug once a month and received extra telephone support from trained nurses showed 47 per cent greater persistence with their drug treatment than those who took a weekly tablet, according to a study in the August issue of IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice.

103 primary care centres across the UK took part in the PERSIST study between January 2005 and January 2006, with 1,076 women each agreeing to participate for a six-month period.

542 were prescribed a single 70mg dose of alendronate once a week and the remainder received a single monthly 150mg dose of ibandronate and were enrolled in a free patient support programme designed to complement the drug.

The monthly ibandronate group received a welcome pack providing basic information about osteoporosis and a monthly reminder call from a trained nurse one to three days before the dose was due.

The nurses also used the opportunity to confirm dosing instructions, provide further information about osteoporosis and stress the importance of adhering to the treatment regime.

835 women completed the study, leaving 440 in the monthly ibandronate group and 395 in the weekly alendronate group.

Of these, just under 57 per cent of patients receiving monthly ibandronate tablets, together with patient support, were taking the medication after six months. The persistence rate for patients on weekly alendronate tablets was 39 per cent.

“Getting patients to continue taking prescribed medication is a major problem for healthcare professionals” says lead author Dr Alun Cooper, a family doctor from the Bridge Medical Centre in Crawley, UK.

“The World Health Organization estimates that only 50 per cent of patients with chronic diseases in developing countries stick to treatment regimes. And the American Heart Association has identified failing to take medication correctly as the number one problem in treating ill health today.

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation one in three women over 50 suffer from osteoporosis worldwide.

“Sufferers find that their bones become increasingly brittle and this increases the risk of serious factures, especially if they don’t take their medication on a regular basis” says Dr Cooper. “It’s estimated that one in two women over 50 will experience a fracture at some time because of fragile bones, so any treatment regime that improves compliance is to be welcomed.”

The women who took part in the study had an average age of 68 and more than a third had a family history of osteoporosis.

45 per cent had already suffered a fracture, with just under a third reporting one incident and a further ten per cent reporting two. Four per cent had experienced three to five factures.

“Our study clearly shows that women who were prescribed monthly doses of ibandronate, and enrolled on a patient support programme, were much more likely to continue taking their medication than those on weekly doses of alendronate” concludes Dr Cooper.

“Evidence suggests that adhering to regular treatment for osteoporosis improves bone mass density and reduces fracture rates. This, in turn, reduces the social and economic burden of this very common and debilitating chronic condition.”

Over 100 family doctors from more than 30 counties across the UK took part in the PERIST research, which was supported by Roche Products Limited.

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ijcp.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>