Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Women show 47% greater persistence with osteoporosis drugs if offered monthly tablet plus support

20.07.2006
Women who took an osteoporosis drug once a month and received extra telephone support from trained nurses showed 47 per cent greater persistence with their drug treatment than those who took a weekly tablet, according to a study in the August issue of IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice.

103 primary care centres across the UK took part in the PERSIST study between January 2005 and January 2006, with 1,076 women each agreeing to participate for a six-month period.

542 were prescribed a single 70mg dose of alendronate once a week and the remainder received a single monthly 150mg dose of ibandronate and were enrolled in a free patient support programme designed to complement the drug.

The monthly ibandronate group received a welcome pack providing basic information about osteoporosis and a monthly reminder call from a trained nurse one to three days before the dose was due.

The nurses also used the opportunity to confirm dosing instructions, provide further information about osteoporosis and stress the importance of adhering to the treatment regime.

835 women completed the study, leaving 440 in the monthly ibandronate group and 395 in the weekly alendronate group.

Of these, just under 57 per cent of patients receiving monthly ibandronate tablets, together with patient support, were taking the medication after six months. The persistence rate for patients on weekly alendronate tablets was 39 per cent.

“Getting patients to continue taking prescribed medication is a major problem for healthcare professionals” says lead author Dr Alun Cooper, a family doctor from the Bridge Medical Centre in Crawley, UK.

“The World Health Organization estimates that only 50 per cent of patients with chronic diseases in developing countries stick to treatment regimes. And the American Heart Association has identified failing to take medication correctly as the number one problem in treating ill health today.

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation one in three women over 50 suffer from osteoporosis worldwide.

“Sufferers find that their bones become increasingly brittle and this increases the risk of serious factures, especially if they don’t take their medication on a regular basis” says Dr Cooper. “It’s estimated that one in two women over 50 will experience a fracture at some time because of fragile bones, so any treatment regime that improves compliance is to be welcomed.”

The women who took part in the study had an average age of 68 and more than a third had a family history of osteoporosis.

45 per cent had already suffered a fracture, with just under a third reporting one incident and a further ten per cent reporting two. Four per cent had experienced three to five factures.

“Our study clearly shows that women who were prescribed monthly doses of ibandronate, and enrolled on a patient support programme, were much more likely to continue taking their medication than those on weekly doses of alendronate” concludes Dr Cooper.

“Evidence suggests that adhering to regular treatment for osteoporosis improves bone mass density and reduces fracture rates. This, in turn, reduces the social and economic burden of this very common and debilitating chronic condition.”

Over 100 family doctors from more than 30 counties across the UK took part in the PERIST research, which was supported by Roche Products Limited.

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ijcp.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>