Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hospital Overcrowding Linked to MRSA

22.06.2006
Overcrowding in specialist hospitals across England could be responsible for increasing rates of MRSA infection, according to research from a University of Ulster team published today (Thursday) in the British Journal of Nursing.

The researchers found that three quarters of English hospitals exceed the recommended 82% bed occupancy rate – with a third of trusts having occupancy rates of 87% or greater. This could mean that there is too little time between one patient being discharged and another being admitted to properly disinfect the bed and surrounding area.

In a continuation of their research into the relationship between rates of MRSA infection and bed occupancy in Northern Ireland, first published in the prestigious Journal of Hospital Infection in November 2005, the researchers have now found that the same relationship may exist in specialist hospitals across England. High levels of occupancy are an indicator of overcrowding.

The original research found a relationship between high rates of bed occupancy and high levels of MRSA in Northern Ireland. In a study published in the British Journal of Nursing today the authors, nursing lecturer Brian Cunningham, Professor of Health Research, George Kernohan, and researcher Thomas Rush, report similar findings in England for 35 specialist hospitals, where data could be matched for all variables.

The House of Commons Public Accounts Committee and other governmental bodies have repeatedly drawn attention to the fact that high levels of bed occupancy is not consistent with good infection control and bed management practices. The researchers found that three-quarters of English hospitals exceed the recommended 82% bed occupancy with a third of Trusts having occupancy of 87% or even greater.

Based on their research from the Northern Ireland studies the researchers estimate that the turnover interval in some medical units could be similar to that in NI trusts, which was estimated at 72 minutes. During this period one patient is discharged, the bed space and bed itself are disinfected, and a new patient is admitted. The minimum time for cleaning the bed alone to an acceptable level could take as long as 75 minutes.

The authors said: “The Healthcare Commission's annual staff survey (2006) based on replies from 209,000 employees in 570 NHS trusts in England reported that one in four said trusts did not do enough to promote the importance of hand-cleaning to staff, patients and visitors and nearly 40% of NHS staff do not have constant access to the hot water, soap, paper towels and alcohol rubs needed to prevent the spread of hospital infection.

“Trusts which fail to give such attention to this basic preventative measures are also unlikely to comply with the high standards required to disinfect beds and bed spaces and, as we have suggested, the time available for cleaning because of short turnover interval and high occupancy rates may be insufficient to prepare for safe admissions of patients.”

The researchers commented on a recent statement by Dr Gill Morgan, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, who said: "More patients are being treated faster and more effectively than ever before by the NHS (...) The number of actual beds has steadily reduced, yet the amount of care the service is able to deliver has dramatically increased." She said also that the health service could do with fewer hospital beds.

Researcher Brian Cunningham said that such statements, usually made by managers and not by clinicians, showed a cultural clash between clinicians and managers. He said that there is a limit to how many patients can be treated safely in hospitals. High levels of occupancy result in limited time for hand-washing, ward cleaning between admission and discharge, overworked and stressed staff, and constant bed crises.

The authors concluded: “The rise in the incidence of MRSA rates may be a symptom of a systems failure in the central and local management of the NHS.”

David Young | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ulster.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections
17.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
14.02.2017 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>