Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cancer therapies during childhood can damage developing teeth

30.08.2005


Research published by the University of Helsinki, Finland, indicates that cytostatic and radiation therapies administered before stem cell transplantation often damage children’s permanent teeth.



Detrimental effects of cytostatic and radiation therapies on dental development have been known for a long time, but knowledge about the dental consequences of high-dose anticancer therapy preceding stem cell transplantation has so far been scarce. Päivi Hölttä, Licentiate in Dentistry, from the Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, has studied the effects of high-dose anticancer chemotherapy and total body irradiation on the development of permanent teeth.

Tooth development is a genetically controlled chain of events that can be disturbed by various environmental factors. The development of permanent teeth begins as early as the 20th week of gestation and continues until the age of 14 to 15 years with the exception of wisdom teeth, which still continue their development for several years. All this time teeth are vulnerable to developmental aberrations.


The children examined in the current study, treated for cancer or aplastic anemia, had received stem cell transplantation at the age from 1 to 9.4 years, preceded with a high-dose anticancer chemotherapy and, in most cases, with total body irradiation. In her research, Hölttä studied how many of the treated children lacked permanent teeth or had unusually small teeth, and how often dental roots were poorly developed.

The results indicated that 31% of the treated children lacked permanent teeth (as opposed to 8% of the Finnish population), when wisdom teeth were excluded. Lack of permanent teeth was most frequent (77%) among children who had been less than three years old at stem cell transplantation. The highest number of missing teeth was 12. Those who had been over five years of age at stem cell transplantation lacked only wisdom teeth. A significant finding was that a high-dose anticancer chemotherapy alone caused a lack of permanent teeth nearly as often as when combined with total body irradiation, which, however, slightly increased the number of missing teeth.

The children also had a high frequency of microdontia, teeth smaller than normal (44% as opposed to 2% of the Finnish population). Microdontia was common among children under five years of age at stem cell transplantation and rare among others. Surprisingly, high-dose anticancer chemotherapy caused microdontia in all those who had been treated when under three years old. Total body irradiation did not increase the number of microdontia patients or microdontic teeth.

Developmental aberrations in dental roots were found in all the children in the study. Some of them had minor changes visible in a few teeth only, while others had severe damage in all their teeth. Total body irradiation increased the number of damaged roots. The children who had only received high-dose anticancer chemotherapy had root damage in over half of their teeth, but the damage was not as severe as with those who had also received total body irradiation.

The lack of several permanent teeth and their small size affect the development of occlusion and the growth of the jaws. Short and sometimes almost non-existent roots may not endure masticatory forces, and periodontal infections may result in an early loss of short-rooted teeth. “We still don’t know about the long-term consequences of the treatments, which is why the monitoring of the patients should be continuous and centralised. Cooperation between specialists in children’s haematology and oncology and specialists in various fields of dentistry is of fundamental importance in providing for these children the best possible dental care in the future,” Päivi Hölttä says.

Paivi Lehtinen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.helsinki.fi

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
19.01.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht On track to heal leukaemia
18.01.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland

19.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Not of Divided Mind

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Molecule flash mob

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>