Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Metal stents are safe and effective for treatment of obstructions from pancreatic cancer

04.05.2005


One key goal of treating pancreatic cancer, which is often fatal within a year, is making sure patients have a good quality of life with as few complications as possible. This is especially important if they are candidates for surgical removal of the cancer.

Now, doctors at the University of Virginia Health System report that placing self-expanding metal tubes or stents (covered with a synthetic material) to drain the common bile duct is a safe and effective treatment for a major complication of pancreatic cancer-- obstructive jaundice. This type of jaundice occurs frequently when pancreatic tumors block the flow of bile from the liver. Cancer patients can experience yellowing of the skin and eyes, itching and dark urine. If untreated, jaundice can lead to infection and abscesses in the liver, which can be fatal.

"It is important that we can now relieve these very significant complications without the major surgery that can often lead to long-term hospitalization and possibly death," said Dr. Michel Kahaleh, a gastroenterologist and assistant professor of internal medicine at UVa’s Digestive Health Center of Excellence. "We can provide resolution of jaundice and alleviate the symptoms for a long period of time, at least long enough until patients are able to have their cancer treated with surgery."



Between March 2001 and November 2004, UVa doctors inserted 88 stents called covered Wallstents (manufactured by Boston Scientific, Inc.) in 80 patients at UVa with bile duct obstructions from malignant cancer. These stents were developed to prevent the growth of tumors into the stent itself and feature a metallic skeleton bound to a synthetic covering resistant to bile and other gastric and pancreatic juices. Writing in the April 2005 issue of the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Kahaleh and his UVa colleagues report that the stents were still open in 90 percent of the patients after three months and were open in almost 80 percent of patients after one year. Complications, however, included migration (movement) of the stent, occlusion of the stent and obstructions of the cystic duct. The stents were easily removed and replaced where needed.

In an accompanying editorial in the same issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Dr. David L. Carr-Locke of Harvard Medical School wrote that covered metal stents to help palliate bile duct malignancy is "the appropriate step in stent technology development and probably confers a clinical advantage over its uncovered counterpart."

Bob Beard | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.virginia.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
27.03.2017 | Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow

27.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Sun's impact on climate change quantified for first time

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>