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Siemens introduces revolutionary nuclear cardiology imaging System

29.04.2005


New c.cam gamma camera provides new angle in cardiology diagnosis

Siemens Medical Solutions today announced that its c.cam – a unique, reclining dedicated cardiac gamma camera system – will be available for the European market. Introduced at the annual meeting of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology 2003, the rising number of nuclear applications in Europe also requires a gamma camera system specialized for examinations of the heart.

The c.cam’s myocardial viability and perfusion capabilities will offer cardiologists increased diagnostic confidence, and the system’s fully integrated software allows analysis of ejection fraction and wall motion. This new system enhances imaging accuracy and efficiency, enabling the cardiologist to start an early therapy or plan more exactly.



But the c.cam not only offers diagnostic advantages, it also improves patient comfort: Unique to the c.cam system is a reclining chair that will provide increased patient comfort, thereby delivering improved image quality. Patients can sit back comfortably in the chair throughout the imaging procedure, decreasing the patients’ fidgeting or movement. This reduces the presence of motion artifacts and improves diagnostic image quality. The reclining chair – which patients have compared to their recliner at home – also provides easier access for patients with mobility challenges, and increased comfort for those with arthritis or other painful conditions.

“Patient motion is one of the biggest problems in nuclear cardiology,” explained Dr. Churchwell, director of Nuclear Cardiology at Page-Campbell Cardiology Group, Nashville, Tennessee/USA. “We’ve found so far with the c.cam that there is a decrease in the amount of motion with patients, and the images have been in many cases better than a traditional gamma camera, both in contrast and image resolution.”

For its exceptional design the c.cam was recognized with two awards in 2004. The International Design (I.D.) Magazine – America’s leading critical magazine covering the art, business and culture of design – has awarded the c.cam with a Design Distinction honor in the Equipment Category in its 50th Annual Design Review. The product also was given a 2004 Excellence in Design Award by Appliance Manufacturer (AM) magazine in the Medical Appliances/Laboratory Equipment category.

The c.cam also is a compact system that can fit into a variety of environments, including both medical practices and hospitals – given that it’s syngo-compatible. Syngo is the uniform user interface developed by Siemens. It is an intuitive software platform for all imaging modalities and systems. syngo simplifies operating processes across various systems, such as magnetic resonance imaging or CT. The 8-foot by 8-foot system footprint fits easily into most exam rooms without the need for extensive and costly remodeling, and system installations take just two days.

Anja Suessner | Siemens AG
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com

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