Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Portable system offers dialysis patients ’liberating’ changes

08.03.2005


A suitcase-sized machine tested at the Indiana University School of Medicine is making life easier for some patients undergoing rigorous dialysis for kidney failure.



A year ago, researchers at IU and across the country began testing the NxStage System One, a portable unit that allows patients to conduct their own dialysis at home or on the road. And the preliminary results are promising, says Michael A. Kraus, M.D., the study’s principal investigator and medical director of IU’s Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis and Acute Dialysis Units.

Dr. Kraus says patients treated with the System One therapy have more stable blood pressure and all of them have reduced or completely stopped their blood-pressure medications. Anemia rates seem to have declined and patients’ appetites have increased. There has been a marked improvement in quality of life for the dialysis patients on daily treatments at Indiana University Hospital, a member of Clarian Health Partners.


"We’ve had mothers who didn’t have the energy take care of their kids, people who had resigned themselves to never work or have a career, basically a lesser quality of life. Now their situations have reversed," Dr. Kraus says. "It has given patients back control over their lives."

Currently, about 70 patients with kidney failure nationwide are treated with NxStage System One, a third of which of these treated at IU and Clarian Health.

Kidney failure, or end stage renal disease, affects some 400,000 Americans, which cause a person to experience a total and irreversible loss of kidney function, leading to the eventual need for dialysis or transplantation. It can be caused by a number of conditions such as nephritis, traumatic injury, diabetes, hypertension or genetic-related disorders.

For end-stage patients who do not have a match for kidney transplant or are not candidates for deceased donor transplantation, the only treatment is dialysis of which there are two types. Less common is peritoneal dialysis, where the patient’s abdominal membrane filters out waste, a process usually performed at home.

The most common form of treatment is hemodialysis, which separates toxins and excess water artificially from the patient’s blood. Hemodialysis usually takes place in clinics or hospitals, though some units have been adapted for home use. Traditionally, patients undergo four hours of "cleansing," three days a week. While effective, the process often leaves patients physically exhausted and unable to resume normal activities.

The NxStage System One delivers hemodialysis, hemofiltration, or ultrafiltration to patients with kidney failure or fluid overload. The system is compact and weighs about 70 pounds. It’s portable because of its freedom from unique electrical requirements and water processing, and can be used not only in a person’s home but also when traveling.

Patients at IU have performed their dialysis in their homes, campers, hotel rooms and other locations far from their homes.

With this system, patients conduct daily dialysis (up to 2 ½ hours) to accommodate their schedules.

"NxStage trial participants at IU undergo extensive training before they are allowed to take the system home with them," Dr. Kraus says. "Training time is typically one to three weeks, and patients also must have trained partners who can assist with the set up and maintenance of the device and its components."

The system has given Indianapolis resident Angela Bunch, who is receiving in-center therapy at IU Hospital, a new lease on life. "I work full time night shifts. I would leave work in the morning, come into the hospital for dialysis three times a week, go home and rest and after that I would crawl into work.

"No pep, no get up and go whatsoever," says Bunch a postal worker who has been on dialysis since 2001. "Now, I can take those stairs at work and at home. The energy level I have now is so much higher. It’s all so very liberating."

That freedom is what allowed Rick Skiles to go on his first extended vacation since starting dialysis in 1997. Last Christmas, the 51-year-old Indianapolis resident was able to cruise the Caribbean with his wife and visit relatives in Virginia. At the end of each day during the trip, Skiles would set up the portable system and conduct his own dialysis.

"There’s no comparison to what I was doing before," Skiles notes of his previous dialysis regimen. "This approach definitely has been life-changing for me."

Joe Stuteville | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.iupui.edu
http://www.nxstage.com/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study suggests possible new target for treating and preventing Alzheimer's
02.12.2016 | Oregon Health & Science University

nachricht The first analysis of Ewing's sarcoma methyloma opens doors to new treatments
01.12.2016 | IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact, High Frequency DC/DC Converter for Aviation

The efficiency of power electronic systems is not solely dependent on electrical efficiency but also on weight, for example, in mobile systems. When the weight of relevant components and devices in airplanes, for instance, is reduced, fuel savings can be achieved and correspondingly greenhouse gas emissions decreased. New materials and components based on gallium nitride (GaN) can help to reduce weight and increase the efficiency. With these new materials, power electronic switches can be operated at higher switching frequency, resulting in higher power density and lower material costs.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with partners have investigated how these materials can be used to make power...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

02.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Plasma-zapping process could yield trans fat-free soybean oil product

02.12.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

What do Netflix, Google and planetary systems have in common?

02.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>