Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New gel pill could mean an end to injections

20.09.2004


Scientists in India have developed a new gel that is taken orally and is capable of delivering drugs to manage diseases often requiring an injection. The research, published in the journal Polymer International, suggests the gel could offer a painless way of treating diabetes, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, bowel cancer, constipation and some infections, all of which require local drug delivery.



In these conditions, oral administration of medication cannot be achieved easily because highly acidic gastric fluid in the stomach contain enzymes that can break down the active drug before it reaches the target site. But Dr Sunil Bajpai and Ms Seema Dubey from the Polymer Research Laboratory at Government Model Science College in Jabalpur, India, produced a polymer gel into which a drug may be simply loaded.

‘Intelligent materials’


The hydrogel system has been designed so that when swallowed by the patient, it passes through the stomach retaining the majority of the drug by protecting it from the stomach acids. 56 % of the drug is released where it is needed - further down the gastrointestinal tract in the colon. It is deposited when the gel swells in response to the colon’s (high) alkaline pH.

“The terpolymeric hydrogel system studied by our team provides an alternative to the parenteral medication of insulin. It is now necessary to carry out in vivo studies of this hydrogel system so that it could be further modified to produce oral delivery pills,” says Bajpai.

In the body

To test the gel, the scientists put vitamin B2 in the hydrogel in place of a drug and studied its releasing capacity in conditions simulating a human body, namely gastric (pH 1.0) and intestinal (pH 7.4) fluids at a body temperature of 37oC, under various experimental conditions. This helped to predict the behaviour of the vitamin-loaded gel in body conditions.

Problems caused by other medication, such as sudden increase and subsequent rapid decrease of blood serum concentration, which sometimes reaches a toxic and ineffective level, can be prevented using the new gel, which gives targeted, controlled release of the drug. “This is important in a number of diseases and medical conditions. The new material developed in this research is simple, elegant, versatile, and performs well,” says Dr Malcolm Purbrick, Industrial Polymer Science Editor of Polymer International.

Lizzy Ray | alfa
Further information:
http://interscience.wiley.com/polymerinternational
http://www.soci.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>