Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Transplant candidates may wait longer for available kidneys

09.09.2004


Researchers from the University of Chicago and Stanford University found that one of the new programs to increase the number of kidneys available for transplantation has disadvantages for candidates with blood type O who are waiting for an organ from a deceased donor. The researchers’ findings appear in the Sept. 15, 2004, issue of Transplantation.



Through a process called list-paired exchange, a person waiting for a kidney transplant gets a higher priority on the wait list for an organ from a deceased donor when a relative makes a living donation to another waiting recipient. The living donor is not able to donate to his or her relative, usually because of blood type incompatibilities, so the willing donor gives his or her kidney to an unknown person on the wait list.

The researchers argue that list-paired exchanges are unethical because they harm an already vulnerable population. The majority of candidates waiting for kidneys have blood type O. They have the longest wait times. Where list-paired exchanges are permitted, the researchers show, wait-list candidates of blood type O are forced to wait even longer for an available deceased donor kidney.


According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, more than 30,000 people with blood type O in the United States are on the kidney wait list as of July 2004. That’s the largest number of candidates compared to the other blood types (A, B and AB). Individuals of all blood types can receive an organ of blood type O, but those with blood type O can only receive a donation from another individual of blood type O.

"Those who are already worst off – have the longest waiting times – are being asked to wait even longer in order that overall more people are getting organs," said corresponding author Lainie Ross, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics and assistant director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago.

"The positive side of list-paired exchanges is that we are going to get more organs into the system, and anything to increase the supply is great," Ross said. "But is it OK to increase the supply of organs if it harms a particular group of people? Justice requires that any new policies that are going to improve the well-being of the community also must benefit those who are worst off."

The United Network of Sharing (UNOS) Region 1, which includes Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, approved list-paired exchanges in February 2001.

Ross and her colleague noted a 2003 report from Region 1. In that report, all of the eight paired recipients had blood type O, but only one donor did. This means that seven individuals in Region 1 received a deceased donor kidney of blood type O ahead of those on the wait list who did not have an available living donor. The researchers said the data confirm their concern that individuals with blood type O on the wait list will be made worst off by a list-paired exchange program that permits people with incompatible blood types to participate.

In 2002, nearly 2,000 blood type O candidates died while waiting for a kidney from a deceased donor. The researchers calculated that if list-paired exchanges were adopted nationally, it could result in an average increased wait time of seven days for blood type O candidates. This translates into an additional 15 deaths per year. Since kidneys are distributed regionally, it could result in even longer wait times in some areas, the researchers note.

Ross and her colleague do not want to prohibit all list-paired exchanges. They propose limiting list-paired exchanges to pairs who are blood type compatible. They propose prohibiting only those list-paired exchanges that are blood type incompatible when the intended recipient has blood type O. "We need restrictions for list-paired exchanges to make them a moral option," Ross said.

The other author of the study is Stefanos Zenios, Ph.D., associate professor of operations, information and technology at Stanford University’s graduate school of business.

Katie O’Boyle | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uchospitals.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hour
24.05.2018 | Arizona State University

nachricht 3D images of cancer cells in the body: Medical physicists from Halle present new method
16.05.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

When corals eat plastics

24.05.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Surgery involving ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure

24.05.2018 | Medical Engineering

First chip-scale broadband optical system that can sense molecules in the mid-IR

24.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>