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"Young’s Effects Online" Database Launched

21.07.2004


The American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) has announced the launch of “Young’s Effects Online,” offering instant access to the effects of thousands of diseases, drugs, and herbal remedies on medical lab tests. The new web-based resource will be introduced at the Annual Meeting and Clinical Lab Exposition, held in Los Angeles, CA from July 25 through July 29, 2004. Visit the AACC booth #2423 and contact Laura Fillmore for more information (see below).

“Young’s Effects Online” is based on the work of Dr. Donald S. Young, Vice Chair for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Health System, who has published these standard reference books on lab tests for the AACC over many years. These publications are an important resource for doctors, laboratorians, and pharmacists because new drugs and herbs are constantly being introduced, many of which are exceedingly potent, with an array of side effects that can change lab tests. With the launch of this online database, users can now enjoy four significant benefits: updated and more comprehensive data (there are more authors, and more drug interactions online than in print), portability (it is Web-based), searchability, and reduced subscription cost. Potential subscribers can visit http://www.fxol.org to sign up for a free trial subscription (for show attendees only).

Web Database Delivers Vital Information



Dr. Young and the AACC chose to work with Open Book Systems (OBS), of Rockport, MA, to bring the Effects database online. Regularly updated data files supply the content for the four large Effects reference books published by AACC, as well as for the website, and soon, for wireless handheld devices. “Traditionally, most of the updated information for the database was entered by me whenever my busy schedule would allow,” said Dr. Young. “I needed a convenient and secure method to allow others to input data. We proposed the online system to allow more information to be more accessible at a low cost,” said Dr. Young. “OBS helped us create Young’s Effects Online, a system that greatly expands access for users while providing a convenient method for us to update.”

Ongoing Creation of Content

The content management system used by the authors and editor of Young’s Effects Online works on both MAC and PC platforms, allowing authors to work offline, running the entire database on their local machines and syncing with the master database whenever they go online. Since the pharmaceutical business operates worldwide, this feature is valuable for authors working remotely where connectivity is not readily available.

The OBS-built system also offers roles-based author/editor/publisher permissioning, so Dr. Young can review all the authors’ submissions before making them public. By streamlining collaboration with other medical professionals around the world, the system allows Dr. Young to accelerate the expansion of the database to deliver the latest Effects updates to doctors sooner.

Online Exclusive: Herbal Supplements

The latest addition to Young’s Effects Online addresses the concerns of doctors who are confronting unregulated herbal supplements used by their patients. Dr. Young comments, “Mainstream medicine does not teach the effects of these non-drug preparations and many physicians tend to think of these preparations as harmless. It is possible that patients will stop using certain herbal preparations if their ill effects can be demonstrated in lab tests.”

The Global Future

Plans are already underway to integrate the Effects database with its European equivalent, the first step towards creating a truly worldwide resource. Dr. Young states, “disease is a global issue and I think it will add tremendous value to include input from as many worldwide sources as we can.”

Access to the online database will soon be expanded beyond geographic considerations to include broader audiences, such as pharmacists and ultimately, the general public.

Visit www.fxol.org to sign up for a free trial subscription to Young’s Effects Online , contact Sales Manager Laura Fillmore at 866-595-5055 or email to subscriptions@fxol.org, for information about institutional subscriptions.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.aacc.org
http://www.obs.com

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