Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Space Tech Captures Toxic Micro-Organisms

15.07.2004


Sophisticated technology developed to ensure clean air for astronauts onboard space stations is now used in hospitals to capture and destroy airborne fungi, bacteria, spores and viruses. It can also eliminate microorganisms causing SARS, ebola, smallpox, and tuberculosis as well as anthrax.



Most of the airborne micro-organisms around us do not present grave hazards to healthy people, however they can pose serious threats to those with reduced immune resistance. The space technology ’PlasmerTM’ now provides an innovative solution to guarantee clean air in several European hospitals.

PlasmerTM is a multistage system using strong electric fields and cold-plasma chambers to eliminate micro-organisms in the air. Using this space technology, the AirInSpace company with support from ESA’s Technology Transfer and Promotion Office (TTP) has developed a transportable and protective unit for use in hospitals and emergency scenarios, providing an easy deployable clean room.


"With the special Plasmer technology we have managed to develop an innovative solution to provide clean air by destroying more than 99.9% of micro-organisms, responding to the special needs of immune-compromised patients in hospitals," says Laurent Fullana, General Manager of AirInSpace.

"Our system ’ImmunairTM’ uses five PlasmerTM reactors to provide a clean-air ’tent’, free of infective germs around a patient’s bed. It is targeted primarily for immuno-haematology, oncology, reanimation and transplant hospital departments. We have produced a smaller version, ’Cool Plasmair’, with no ’tent’, for use across a wide range of hospital areas where cross infection is a concern."

Since early 2001 the system has been under test for a 12-month period in five hospitals. Dr Svetlana Challier, of the Necker Hospital in Paris, says, "ImmunairTM makes it possible to reduce significantly the bacteria level in the air."

Another user of the system, Professor François Demeocq, CHU/Hôtel-Dieu in Clermont-Ferrand, reports, "The biological protection with the ImmunairTM system is very satisfactory and responds well to the needs required for children with strongly reduced immune defence following chemotherapy treatments. It could also be used to provide the protection after transplants."

Demeocq adds, "For the children and their parents, this device is more convenient in everyday life and allows the emotional contact which is essential for these children who are isolated for a very long time."

The PlasmerTM technology for the biological decontamination of air onboard manned spacecraft was invented in the early 90s by a group of Russian scientists. In 1997 the Russian space station MIR was equipped with PlasmerTM reactors successfully protecting cosmonauts and electronic equipment from bacteria, viruses and fungal contamination.

In April 2001, PlasmerTM reactors were installed to clean the air from micro-organisms in the Russian segments on the International Space Station. Now the PlasmerTM space technology has moved down to Earth to protect immune-compromised patients in hospitals.

Pierre Brisson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

nachricht What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?
24.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>