Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Bio-adhesive For Viscera And Tissues


It is more convenient to glue parts together than to suture them. Even surgeons agree to that. They only need a good adhesive. Siberian researchers have created the third generation bio-adhesive and successfully tested it on animals.

Surgery is steadily improving methods for joining of slit parts. To solve the problem, biological adhesives were recently used. More often physicians use chemical compounds based on alpha cyanoacrylates, which do not provoke allergy or stimulate tumorogenesis. The Novosibirsk researchers, specialists of the Central Administrative Board for Research Center of Clinical and Experimental Medicine (Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences), Central Administrative Board for Scientific Research Institute of Regional Pathology and Pathomorphology (Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences) and Novosibirsk State Medical Academy (Ministry of Public Health of the Russian Federation) have developed a new adhesive composition called “Sulfacrylate” and tested it in practice.

“Sulfacrylate” is bio-adhesive of the third generation, it includes various esters of acrylic acid and its derivatives. Experiments were carried out on 142 animals: rats, outbred cats and Chinchilla rabbits. Under anaesthetic, in line with all rules of operating skill, a part of animals’ liver, spleen, kindey or bowels was ablated and then the injured tissues were glued together. The background groups consisted of the animals which were sutured after the operation. The researchers were interested in the influence of bio-adhesive on the tissues in the course of cicatrization, therefore the operated animals were slaughtered 3, 6 and 12 hours, a day, a week and a month after the operation to investigate the tissue status under the microscope.

The observations proved that the adhesive lays well on tissues and forms a polymer film. The film stops local bleeding and joins the slit parts hermetically. The zone of mortifing tissue, which always occurs in the area of the wound, was small and well-defined. “Sulfacrylate” contributed to formation of this zone, however its local toxic effect was over soon. In a month the wound closed up completely and the adhesive dissolved. Inflammation inevitably accompanies cicatrization, but the adhesive allowed to avoid festering. The animals from the background group had tissues injured not only during the operation, but also during suture, therefore the necrotic zone and local hemorrhages were much more extensive than in case of utilizing the adhesive, and cicatrization went through a stage of suppurative inflammation with microabscesses.

The benefits of “Sulfacrylate” are particularly noticeable in the cases when a lanced intestine is to be joined butt-to-butt. The researchers tested this joint for strength with the help of special pneumoequipment, which allows to measure the threshhold pressure: the adhesive joins stronger than the suture material. Glued intestinal loops can stand even severe treatment when getting preparations ready for microscopy. No stitch separated, no intestinal lumen was narrowed, no commissures occured either between intestinal loops, or adjacent organs, let alone peritonitis. Three months after the operation, the glued intestine remained elastic and did not become deformed, but the animals from the background group experienced all complications typical of intestines operations.

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae
14.03.2018 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht Researchers identify key step in viral replication
13.03.2018 | University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensions

19.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

19.03.2018 | Materials Sciences

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>