Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Synthetic marijuana reduces agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s

17.11.2003


Reduction of agitation leads to less stress for caregiver; better care for patient



Results from a Phase II, multi-center study found dronabinol, a synthetic version of the active ingredient in marijuana, reduces agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the research concluded that reduced agitation may contribute to the relief of caregiver burden associated with the condition. The findings were presented at the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists’ 34th annual meeting.

"Our results show dronabinol is an effective treatment for behavioral agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s and may ultimately help reduce the stress often experienced by caregivers," said geriatrician Joel S. Ross, M.D. a member of the teaching faculty at Monmouth Medical Center and the lead investigator in the study. "While difficult for the patient, the effects of agitation can greatly impact the emotional and physical health of family members and caregivers. By reducing patients’ agitation, caregivers are able to focus more time and energy on their patients’ overall wellbeing."


Dronabinol, marketed as Marinol, is synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC). Delta-9-THC also is a naturally occurring component of Cannabis sativa L (marijuana). Dronabinol has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of anorexia in patients with HIV/AIDS and for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. Recent clinical tests also have examined dronabinol’s potential to relieve symptoms of multiple sclerosis.1

Agitation is the most common behavioral management problem in patients with Alzheimer’s and affects an estimated 75 percent of people with the disease. It may lead to a variety of symptoms ranging from physical and/or verbal abusive postures, physically non-aggressive conduct including pacing and restlessness, as well as verbally disturbed behaviors such as screaming and repetitive requests for attention.

More than 80 percent of caregivers report they frequently experience high levels of stress, and nearly half say they suffer from depression, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Phase II, open label, randomized, parallel-group study involved 54 community-dwelling patients at two sites, all who demonstrated behavioral agitation (mean age = 81). All patients were over the age of 50 years and met DSM-IV criteria for dementia related to Alzheimer’s. The Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) were used to measure severity of Alzheimer’s disease and agitation level, respectively. Following a one-week qualifying period to evaluate the degree of agitation, patients were screened on Day 0, evenly randomized to one of two treatment groups (dronabinol 2.5 mg bid or dronabinol 5 mg bid) on Day 7, and returned for clinic visits on Day 21, Day 35 and Day 63. The primary efficacy measurement was the CMAI, a 38-item rating scale that evaluates the prevalence of pathological and disruptive behaviors. The secondary efficacy measurements were the Caregiver’s Burden Inventory (CBI), CGI Severity of Alzheimer’s disease (CGI-S AD), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL) and MMSE. Evaluation at nine weeks found significant reductions of CMAI scores in both groups. There also was a trend toward a decrease in CBI scores and increase in IADL scores in both groups, without a statistical difference between the two doses. The 5 mg bid group experienced a trend toward a decrease in CGI-S AD scores.

Doses could be adjusted during the study, allowing for a patient to receive both doses of the medication and be included in both groups at the time of evaluation for efficacy and adverse events. Adverse events experienced by more the five percent of patients involved in the study included abnormal gait, accidental injury, agitation, anxiety, asthenia, dizziness, somnolence, spontaneous bone fracture and vomiting. Two deaths occurred in the patient population, but investigators determined both were unrelated to the medication.

Monmouth Medical Center, an affiliate of the Saint Barnabas Health Care System, is a 527-bed community teaching hospital located in Long Branch, NJ. For two decades, Monmouth Medical Center’s geriatric program has been a recognized leader in the development of unique health care services for seniors. In 1982, a multidisciplinary geriatric team was established in response to the growing needs of older adults. Today, the Greenwall Geriatric Program at Monmouth coordinates health and social services for the elderly and their families in a community-teaching-hospital environment.


1Zajicek, J. The Lancet, Nov. 8, 2003: vol 263;pp 1517-1526.

Kathleen Horan | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections
17.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
14.02.2017 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>