Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Breast cancer amongst young women

14.11.2003


Breast cancer is the most common and the second-most fatal malignant tumour amongst women who live in industrialised countries. Moreover, when present in young women, it would appear that a genetic predisposition is involved. This predisposition can be due to a number of causes and, amongst the most common, lie the alterations in the gene suppressors of the tumours. The lack of efficiency in these genes may be due to the fact that they are altered (mutated), they are not expressed, or they do not function because their start-up system (methylation) is altered, or a fragment is missing (deletion).



Mutations of specific gene suppressors (Brca1, Bcra2, ATM; Che2...), which in principle might be thought to be of great use in the clinic, are much more frequent than previously thought and, moreover, difficult to detect in many occasions. This is why, in clinical applications, more general markers to help in the prognosis of early breast cancer development are sought. These markers would indicate, for example, which patients need chemotherapy and which do not.

Double cause


Every woman has two copies of each cancer suppressor gene, one in each chromosome. Only when both copies suffer alteration do the gene suppressors cease to function and cancer is induced. In breast cancer amongst young women, one of the copies is usually damaged from birth and a second error occurs in the breast cells at an adult age. It has been postulated that when both errors occur together, it is probable that one of them is fragment loss.

Taking into account this hypothesis, a number of Hospital and University research groups from the Basque Country are trying to determine if the detection of loss of DNA fragments at specific locations on the genoma might have prognostic value.

Indicative deletions

In order to analyse the importance of this loss, normal, peritumorous and tumorous cells are extracted by micro-dissection and looked at to see if any deletion has taken place, comparing the tumorous DNA with the DNA of the normal cells. In this way, it is wished to analyse the importance that this deletion has in the development of the cancer, i.e. if it is going to be more aggressive or less so. To date, moreover, deletion in those zones where breast cancer suppressor genes had already been found has been studied. Now, on the other hand, other regions are analysed as the location of regions where deletions or DNA fragment loss appear would indicate that, given that a cancer has developed, an undiscovered gene suppressor may be found in this piece.

This study is, moreover, part of a wider project on breast cancer which also includes Basurto Hospital’s research into breast cancer suppressor gene mutations and that of the Dept. of Cellular Dynamics and Zoology at the Pharmacy Faculty in Gasteiz on the methylation of these genes. The aim of this work is to examine all possible causes of breast cancer amongst young women and, thus, help to map a more detailed prognosis of the illness in its development stages in order to be able to apply the most suitable treatment in each case.

For more information please contact:

Garazi Andonegi
Elhuyar Fundazioa
garazi@elhuyar.com
+34 943 363040

Garazi Andonegi | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>