Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Breast cancer amongst young women


Breast cancer is the most common and the second-most fatal malignant tumour amongst women who live in industrialised countries. Moreover, when present in young women, it would appear that a genetic predisposition is involved. This predisposition can be due to a number of causes and, amongst the most common, lie the alterations in the gene suppressors of the tumours. The lack of efficiency in these genes may be due to the fact that they are altered (mutated), they are not expressed, or they do not function because their start-up system (methylation) is altered, or a fragment is missing (deletion).

Mutations of specific gene suppressors (Brca1, Bcra2, ATM; Che2...), which in principle might be thought to be of great use in the clinic, are much more frequent than previously thought and, moreover, difficult to detect in many occasions. This is why, in clinical applications, more general markers to help in the prognosis of early breast cancer development are sought. These markers would indicate, for example, which patients need chemotherapy and which do not.

Double cause

Every woman has two copies of each cancer suppressor gene, one in each chromosome. Only when both copies suffer alteration do the gene suppressors cease to function and cancer is induced. In breast cancer amongst young women, one of the copies is usually damaged from birth and a second error occurs in the breast cells at an adult age. It has been postulated that when both errors occur together, it is probable that one of them is fragment loss.

Taking into account this hypothesis, a number of Hospital and University research groups from the Basque Country are trying to determine if the detection of loss of DNA fragments at specific locations on the genoma might have prognostic value.

Indicative deletions

In order to analyse the importance of this loss, normal, peritumorous and tumorous cells are extracted by micro-dissection and looked at to see if any deletion has taken place, comparing the tumorous DNA with the DNA of the normal cells. In this way, it is wished to analyse the importance that this deletion has in the development of the cancer, i.e. if it is going to be more aggressive or less so. To date, moreover, deletion in those zones where breast cancer suppressor genes had already been found has been studied. Now, on the other hand, other regions are analysed as the location of regions where deletions or DNA fragment loss appear would indicate that, given that a cancer has developed, an undiscovered gene suppressor may be found in this piece.

This study is, moreover, part of a wider project on breast cancer which also includes Basurto Hospital’s research into breast cancer suppressor gene mutations and that of the Dept. of Cellular Dynamics and Zoology at the Pharmacy Faculty in Gasteiz on the methylation of these genes. The aim of this work is to examine all possible causes of breast cancer amongst young women and, thus, help to map a more detailed prognosis of the illness in its development stages in order to be able to apply the most suitable treatment in each case.

For more information please contact:

Garazi Andonegi
Elhuyar Fundazioa
+34 943 363040

Garazi Andonegi | Basque research
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>