Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Leptin regulates the immune response to friend and foe

16.01.2003


The hormone leptin, primarily produced in fat cells, helps regulate food intake, metabolism and reproduction. It has also been shown to promote and sustain the bodys immune response by binding to T lymphocytes - the frontline cells that protect against infection.



The disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice is currently used by researchers as a model of human multiple sclerosis (MS). The disease is characterized by the production of autoreactive T lymphocytes that turn against the body and attack cells within the brain and spinal cord, first inducing weight loss and ultimately resulting in paralysis.

In the January 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Giuseppe Matarese and colleagues at IEOS-CNR at Università di Napoli "Federico II", Napoli, Italy report that just prior to developing the clinical symptoms of EAE, mice experience a significant burst of leptin which correlates with a reduction in food intake and weight loss. Furthermore, subjecting mice to acute starvation, which prevents the production of leptin, was found to delay the onset and reduce the severity of disease. In addition, leptin secretion from T lymphocytes was found to further contribute to overall leptin production during EAE.


"Once again we witness the remarkable choreography of molecules related to body weight and energy metabolism and the parallel roles of these same molecules in the finely tuned immune response" stated Dr. Lawrence Steinman and colleagues at Stanford University, California in their accompanying commentary. They go on to say that "these results imply that in autoimmunity, stress may be beneficial, and that short-term starvation may help reverse disease". Stress is detrimental and eating is recommended when fighting bacterial infections, however it appears that in the case of autoimmunity, the opposite holds true - stress and fasting is helpful.

These results suggest that leptin actively contributes to the pathogenesis of EAE, influencing both its onset and clinical severity. Interestingly, leptin is produced at much higher levels in females than males, which may account for the higher susceptibility of females to autoimmune diseases, a fact that has long puzzled scientists. The authors suggest that modulating leptin concentration through dietary approaches, and/or the administration of drugs that interfere with the bodys own production of leptin, may have potential utility in the treatment of MS and other autoimmune diseases.


###
CONTACT:
Giuseppe Matarese
Gruppo di ImmunoEndocrinologia
Instituto di Endocrinologia e Oncologia Sperimentale
Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche (IEOS-CNR) and Cattedra di Immunologia
Dipartmento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare
Università di Napoli "Federico II", via S. Pansini 5 - 80131
Napoli
ITALY
Phone: +39-081-7463311
Fax: +39-081-7463252
E-mail: gmatarese@napoli.com

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/press/16721.pdf

ACCOMPANYING COMMENTARY:
The intricate interplay among body weight, stress, and the immune response to friend or foe

CONTACT:
Lawrence Steinman
Interdepartmental Program in Immunology and the
Department of Neurological Sciences Stanford University
B002 Beckman Center for Molecular medicine
Stanford, CA 94205
USA
Phone: (650) 725-6401
Fax: (650) 725-0627
E-mail: steinman@standford.edu

View the PDF of this commentary at: https://www.the-jci.org/press/17622.pdf


Brooke Grindlinger, PhD | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.the-jci.org/press/16721.pdf
http://www.the-jci.org/press/17622.pdf

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>