Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New model for vascular and tumour research


VOGIM cell culture technique allows tumour growth to be observed

Two characteristic features of malignant tumours are that they form massive blood vessels and bypass the immune system. A new cell culture technique allows the processes of tumour growth to be studied directly and in real time, without the need for complex experiments using live animals.

Tumour-induced cell death and tumour zones I and II. The tumour is shown in green, damaged neurons are shown in red and cell nuclei are shown in blue.

The researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) who developed the technique looked specifically at brain tumours. The team led by neuroscientist PD Dr. Nicolai Savaskan developed a 3D cell culture technique called the Vascular Organotypic Glioma Impact Model (VOGIM) which allows the formation of tumour blood vessels and their interaction with immune cells to be observed over a period of several days in an organotypic context.

This new method will allow new medications and therapies to be analysed directly, and enable side effects to be identified more quickly and efficiently than when using conventional cell culture techniques. VOGIM also allows the amount of animal testing required in vascular studies to be reduced. The results of the study by researchers at the Department of Neurosurgery at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen have now been published in the journal ONCOTARGET.

'VOGIM is a complex technique that allows tumours to be studied in real time and under clinically realistic conditions – without the need for live animal testing,' says Dr. Nicolai Savaskan, who led the study. In the technique tissue samples from rodent brains are infected with tumour cells expressing fluorescent reporter genes.

The growth of tumour cells and blood vessels, cell death, and the influence of medications on these developments are observed in the experiment. 'Even though VOGIM still requires some animal testing, it is a great technique. It can be used to test the effectiveness of new medications and molecules against gliomas – tumours of the central nervous system – relatively quickly and in a way that is reproducible,' Dr. Savaskan explains.

'We can also use it to study the side effects of almost any medication.' The next goal of the Erlangen-based researchers is to test new hybrid molecules from the plant and animal kingdom in this system in order to quickly develop new treatment strategies.

Brain tumours have destructive effects on the surrounding cells and blood vessels. Accumulations of serum around the tumour are a common symptom. These cause swelling in the brain and increase pressure inside the skull to dangerous levels.

In the worst case, the swelling can cause pressure on the respiratory centre above the cervical spine, quickly leading to suffocation. The cause of this swelling in the brain are pathological changes to the tumour blood vessels and disruption of the immune response to the brain tumour.

The accumulations of serum are caused by the tumour cells which damage surrounding tissue and cells, making them more permeable. The new VOGIM technique allows the tumour blood vessels and the immune system of the brain to be observed closely and the influence of new therapeutics to be studied in this context.

Original publication: Ali Ghoochani, Eduard Yakubov, Tina Sehm, Zheng Fan, Stefan Hock, Michael Buchfelder, Ilker Y. Eyüpoglu, Nicolai E. Savaskan: A versatile ex vivo technique for assaying tumor angiogenesis and microglia in the brain. ONCOTARGET 2015.
DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.6550
Full text:

Further information:
PD Dr. Nicolai Savaskan
Phone: +49 9131 8544748

Patient information:
Phone: +49 9131 8549000

Dr. Susanne Langer | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>