Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New insights into the etiology of age-related macular degeneration by a large genetic study

23.12.2015

Vision loss is a major burden for individuals. One of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly, Age-related Macular Degeneration, has been the target of a recent large international genetic study. The researchers, teaming up from around the world, aimed at unravelling the genetic catalogue of this disabling disease and identified new genetic regions relevant for the disease including one that is solely related to one subtype of this disease. Overall this large study provides insights into the genetic architecture of age-related macular degeneration and to future designs of genetic studies.

Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness and severe disability that affects ten million older individuals worldwide. Therapy options are limited as currently therapy is only available for patients with one of the two disease subtypes, the so-called wet AMD, and even this therapy is symptomatic and no cure.

Unfortunately, it is not well understood by doctors or scientists why some people develop the disease while others remain disease-free. A major portion of the risk for AMD is the combination of genetic variants a person possesses; other risk factors include smoking or intensive light exposure. Finding the exact combination of genetic variants that puts people at risk for AMD is a difficult task that requires evaluating information from many thousands of individuals.

To get at the goal of better understanding the genetic influence of AMD risk, an international group of scientists from 26 study sites, including scientists from the University of Regensburg, joined forces to create and evaluate an extensive genome-wide data set that provided an excellent platform for a thorough search for gene regions that may influence AMD risk.

Using medical information and DNA from blood collected from more than 43,000 participants with and without AMD across the world, this group applied novel methods, that enabled the investigation of 12 million genetic variants. Not only did they find 34 gene regions for AMD including 16 that have not been described before. The new regions provide new clues to search for cures for this severe medical condition.

Most interestingly, this international group also identified a genetic region around the MMP9 gene that showed only an effect for the wet AMD, but not for dry AMD. This new knowledge might lead to a better understanding of why the therapy is more effective in some patients than in others.

The genetic make-up of a patient might also help explain why some treated patients suffer from a recurrence: To some extent this might be simply that the genetics hits again.

The investigators also had a specific focus on rare variants that alter the protein. If such a variant is found to be relevant for the disease, the mechanisms by what this variant exerts its effect is much easier to derive than for other variants: the specific change in the protein itself is then very likely the cause. While several such variants for AMD were depicted by this study, the study made also clear that these variants can be very rare and hard to depict.

This work also substantiates a strong role of the University of Regensburg. Researchers from the UR Institute of Human Genetics and the Department of Genetic Epidemiology have not only contributed study data, but also helped organize the international consortium (Prof. Weber) and co-lead and conducted (Prof. Heid and team) the analysis of this complex and high-dimensional data.

Overall, the results published in Nature Genetics (NG-A41068R2) help understand what makes individuals susceptible to the disease, which patients might benefit from a particular form of treatment, and what might be worthwhile next steps towards a cure that would be the hope of millions of patients (www.nature.com/ng/journal/v45/n4/full/ng.2578.html ).

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Iris Heid
Universität Regensburg
Chair for Genetic Epidemiology
Tel.: +49 (0)941 944-5210/5211
Iris.Heid@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

Alexander Schlaak | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.uni-regensburg.de/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Nanoparticles as a Solution against Antibiotic Resistance?
15.12.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>