Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Inhaled glucocorticoids during pregnancy and offspring pediatric diseases

16.12.2011
Inhaled glucocorticoids for the treatment of asthma during pregnancy are not associated with an increased risk of most diseases in offspring, but may be a risk factor for endocrine and metabolic disturbances, according to a new study.

In a population-based cohort study, 65,085 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed up in real time from early pregnancy into childhood. "Maternal use of inhaled glucocorticoids for asthma during pregnancy was not related to an increased risk of most diseases in childhood, except for endocrine and metabolic disorders, as compared to the risk in asthmatic mothers without glucocorticoid inhalation during pregnancy," said first author Marion Tegethoff, PhD, associate faculty member in clinical psychology and psychiatry at the University of Basel, Switzerland. "Our data are mostly reassuring and support the use of inhaled glucocorticoids during pregnancy."

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Of 65,085 mother-child pairs with live singleton pregnancies, 61,002 had no asthma during pregnancy (93.7%) and 4083 (6.3%) had asthma during pregnancy. Median age at end of follow-up was 6.1 years (range: 3.6 to 8.9 years). In statistical analyses adjusted for baseline predictors of child health, use (versus no use) of inhaled glucocorticoids was associated with a significantly increased risk for the first diagnosis of endocrine and metabolic disorders (hazard ratio [HR], 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-2.99), but not of diseases in any other category. Results were similar when analyses were restricted to mother-child pairs exposed only to budesonide, the inhaled glucocorticoid used by the majority of women (79.9%) in the study.

"This is the first comprehensive study of potential effects of glucocorticoid inhalation during pregnancy on the health of offspring, covering a wide spectrum of pediatric diseases," said last author Gunther Meinlschmidt, PhD, associate faculty member in clinical psychology and epidemiology at the University of Basel, Switzerland. "While our results support the use of these widely used asthma treatments during pregnancy, their effect on endocrine and metabolic disturbances during childhood merits further study."

There were some limitations to the study, including a lack of data on daily inhalation doses, use of self-report of maternal asthma and the study's focus on glucocorticoid inhalation rather than other active ingredients or glucocorticoids administered by other routes.

"Our data have both clinical and public health implications," the authors concluded, "given that asthma is common in pregnant women and inhaled glucocorticoids are the recommended treatment."

About the American Journal of Respiratory Research and Critical Care Medicine:

With an impact factor of 10.191, the AJRRCM is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Thoracic Society. It aims to publish the most innovative science and the highest quality reviews, practice guidelines and statements in the pulmonary, critical care and sleep-related fields.

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society's 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy.

Nathaniel Dunford | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.thoracic.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period
27.07.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Programming cells with computer-like logic

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period

27.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>