Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Diabetics who use meters to monitor their glucose have better control over disease

17.06.2013
Mount Sinai researchers present new data at ENDO 2013, The Endocrine Society's Annual Meeting & Expo June 15-18 in San Francisco

New York– Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will present several new studies at ENDO 2013, The Endocrine Society's Annual Meeting & Expo (ENDO) from June 15-18 in San Francisco.

Mount Sinai researchers will demonstrate new data on diabetes self-management, as well as the role of prostastic acid phosphatase (PAP) in Prostate Cancer (PCa) bone metastases; identify new molecules that can stimulate the thyroid gland; reveal the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in an urban population; and show how thyroid autoimmunity may be triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.

Highlights of Mount Sinai research at ENDO 2013:

Availability of Reliable Home Blood Glucose Data at Diabetes Appointments and Correlation with Hemoglobin A1C (Under embargo until 1:45 pm PDT on Sunday, June 16, 2013)

Medicaid and Medicare patients with uncontrolled diabetes, who brought their glucose meters to appointments, and monitored levels at home, lowered their Hemoglobin A1c by 1.2 percent, whereas all other patients saw no change in their A1c. The research highlighting diabetes self-management was conducted by Ronald Tamler, MD, PhD, CDE, Clinical Director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at The Mount Sinai Medical Center and his team, and presented in an ENDO 2013 poster session. "These results show that there is still much work to be done in educating patients about the benefits of glucose monitoring," said Dr. Tamler. "We also need to focus our resources on the population most likely to benefit from this kind of monitoring. After all, the effect seen in Medicare and Medicaid patients rivals that of adding another medication."

The team reviewed data on 500 adult patients at the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center and determined that 30 percent of the patients (almost all insulin-treated) brought glucose meters to their visits. "Hand-written glucose logs can be misleading," said Gillian Boyd-Woschinko, MD, Chief Endocrine Fellow at Mount Sinai and lead author of the study. "Past research has shown then when comparing hand written logs to meter data, it can be inaccurate due to under-reporting and over-reporting. Both occur as a result of human error, the desire to please the physician, and lack of understanding of the utility of accurate data. We encourage all patients to bring their blood glucose meters to their appointments, so we can download them."

Prostatic Acid Phosphatase in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases: Rank Ligand as a Mediator (Under embargo until 10:45 am PDT on Sunday, June 16, 2013)

Levels of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), the oldest tumor marker, are elevated in men with prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastases, according to research presented by Alice C. Levine, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Diseases at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and her team in a highlighted poster session. According to Dr. Levine, PCa has a tendency to spread to the bone where it becomes incurable and blood PAP levels are higher in men with PCa bone metastases.

"Currently, there are no curative therapies for this stage of the disease," said Dr. Levine. "Our study could have wide-ranging clinical applications for men with advanced PCa that has spread to bone."

Researchers studied two PCa cell lines and a mouse preosteoblast (OB) line. All three cell lines expressed measurable amounts of two proteins, RANK Ligand (RANKL) and Osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA/protein that are known to be essential regulators of bone formation and breakdown. The results suggested that PAP secreted by PCa cells in bone metastases modulates RANKL/OPG expression in both PCa and OB cells and therefore inhibitors of PAP may effectively target the RANKL/OPG system and treat bone metastases.

The study took place from February 2012 until April 2013 and was funded through an Exploration Hypothesis Award from the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Program.

Pathways to Thyroid Stimulation: Identification of New Potent and Selective Small Molecular Agonists to the TSH Receptor (Under embargo until 11:15 am PDT on Sunday, June 16, 2013)

Mount Sinai researchers have identified two novel and potent small molecular compounds proven to be effective in stimulating the thyroid gland and producing more thyroid hormone.

For this study, Terry F. Davies, MD, the Florence and Theodore Baumritter Professor of Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and his research team screened 50,000 molecules, narrowed them down to 20 molecules which had activity and then identified two molecules with high potency and specificity.

"One of the two molecules identified has a very impressive potency and the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool and therapeutic agent in individuals," said Dr. Davies, who is giving an oral presentation at ENDO 2013. "This newly- identified molecule could lead to the pharmaceutical development of a very effective form of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), similar to Thyrogen. This drug works by binding to TSH receptors on normal thyroid cells or on thyroid cancer tissue and helps to determine if there are any thyroid cells or thyroid cancer cells remaining after removal of the thyroid gland. Our identification of such novel and potent molecules could have the potential to develop new treatments for thyroid dysfunction, including thyroid cancer, in the future."

Prevalence of Primary Aldosteronism in an Urban Hypertensive Population (Under embargo until 1:45 am PDT on Monday, June 17, 2013)

With 65 million people in the U.S. diagnosed with hypertension, Dr. Levine and her research team at Mount Sinai will present data showing that primary aldosteronism (PA) is under diagnosed and undertreated in patients. PA is a disorder where the adrenal glands make too much of the hormone aldosterone, which was once thought of as a very rare cause of high blood pressure in patients with hypertension, with or without low blood potassium levels,

The data from this study shows that 4.7 percent of patients tested in the study had blood aldosterone and renin levels indicating they may have PA. Those patients are currently undergoing further testing for the diagnosis. "It is important to ascertain whether PA is a common cause of high blood pressure in our urban population since many of the drugs we currently employ would not be effective if this is the underlying cause," said Dr. Levine. "Medical and surgical therapies are now available that could properly target this disease."

According to Dr. Levine, physicians do not generally screen hypertensive patients for this disorder unless they have very severe high blood pressure and also have low blood potassium levels.

"Testing for PA involves a very simple blood screening test which can be done in almost all hypertensive patients without even discontinuing their drugs," said Dr. Levine. "As a result of our research, many more screening tests have been done by physicians at Mount Sinai, and previously unsuspected cases have been confirmed and patients have been properly treated."

For the study, the first of a large urban population in the United States, researchers screened 260 individuals for PA who had previously been diagnosed with hypertension. Researchers measured the levels of aldosterone and renin through two separate blood tests. The study was conducted with patients in New York City from August 2012 until May 2013.

Pinpointing Interpheron-alpha in Thyroid Autoimmunity: The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress (Under embargo until 11:15 AM PDT on Sunday, June 16, 2013)

Thyroid autoimmunity might be triggered by a process called Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress, which can even occur following a viral infection, according to Angela Lombardi, PhD, a post-doctoral fellow at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai who is making an oral presentation. Dr. Lombardi was mentored by Yaron Tomer, MD, FACP, Chief of the Hilda & J. Lester Gabrilove Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

ER stress is a process in which cell production and packaging of newly-synthesized proteins is perturbed. This can trigger an autoimmune response which can lead to inflammation and cause cell death. In this study, a human thyroid cell line and human primary thyroid cells were exposed to interferon-alpha (IFN-a), a protein which is secreted during infections. The cells were then tested for markers of ER stress. As a result, both the cell line and the primary thyroid cell cultures showed high levels of ER stress.

"This study showed that one of the main proteins produced by cells in response to infection can also cause ER stress in thyroid cells which can trigger thyroid autoimmunity," said Dr. Tomer. "This discovery will enable us to test ER stress blockers for their effectiveness to treat and prevent thyroid immunity in the future."

About the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at Mount Sinai

The mission of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Bone Disease is excellence in the delivery of patient care, research, and education. Researchers in the division are expanding understanding of disease and identifying new treatments. The next generation of physicians, scientists and physician-scientists are being trained to take the latest advances in the laboratory and apply them at the bedside. All of the division's efforts are targeted to bring the highest quality care to patients. For more information, visit http://www.mssm.edu/endo.
About The Mount Sinai Medical Center

The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses both The Mount Sinai Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Established in 1968, the Icahn School of Medicine is one of the leading medical schools in the United States, and is noted for innovation in education, biomedical research, clinical care delivery, and local and global community service. It has more than 3,400 faculty in 32 departments and 14 research institutes, and ranks among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and by U.S. News & World Report.

The Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is a 1,171-bed tertiary- and quaternary-care teaching facility and one of the nation's oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked The Mount Sinai Hospital 14th on its elite Honor Roll of the nation's top hospitals based on reputation, safety, and other patient-care factors. Mount Sinai is one of 12 integrated academic medical centers whose medical school ranks among the top 20 in NIH funding and by U.S. News & World Report and whose hospital is on the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll. Nearly 60,000 people were treated at Mount Sinai as inpatients last year, and approximately 560,000 outpatient visits took place.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/.

Find Mount Sinai on:

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mountsinainyc
Twitter @mountsinainyc
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/mountsinainy

Renatt Brodsky | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mountsinai.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New study points the way to therapy for rare cancer that targets the young
22.11.2017 | Rockefeller University

nachricht Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
21.11.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Corporate coworking as a driver of innovation

22.11.2017 | Business and Finance

PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Quantum optics allows us to abandon expensive lasers in spectroscopy

22.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>