Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Hopkins researchers use diffusion MRI technique to monitor ultrasound uterine fibroid treatment


Johns Hopkins researchers have, for what is believed to be the first time, used a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), a technique that images the movement, or diffusion, of water molecules in tissues, to successfully determine the effectiveness of high-intensity focused ultrasound for treating uterine fibroids. Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors that line the uterine wall and can cause intense pain and bleeding. The study appears in the July edition of Radiology.

Ultrasound treatment works by directing focused ultrasound energy that heats the targeted tissue to induce cell damage or death without damaging the surrounding tissue. Because it’s noninvasive, the treatment provides a desirable alternative to conventional surgery and was undergoing clinical trials nationally and was recently given FDA approval.

When fibroids or other tissues are damaged or destroyed by ultrasound treatment, water molecules are trapped within the tissue because the cellular pumps that control the movement of water into or out of cells no longer function properly. By measuring the movement of this water using DWI, the researchers hoped to better gauge the impact of treatment on the fibroids by using a quantitative biophysical parameter called the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC).

Currently, treatment success is determined using regular MRI with a contrast agent (a dye injected into the patient to enhance the resulting image). However, the image produced during this procedure does not precisely show functional information on the degree of fibroid destruction. Therefore, physicians also rely on questionnaires administered to patients after their fibroid treatment, which often are very subjective and unreliable.

In the study, 14 patients with uterine fibroids received ultrasound treatment and subsequent MR imaging using three different MR techniques: conventional MRI, MRI with contrast material, and DWI MRI. Results showed significantly greater signal intensity on DWI of ultrasound treated fibroids than on the images of untreated fibroids or treated fibroids obtained with the other MR methods. These results were confirmed in the 12 patients who took part in the six-month follow up study. Also observed were differences in the ADC. The DWI technique was able to map the ADC in fibroids, showing lower ADC values in treated fibroids than in surrounding tissue, a measure of restricted cellular water flow due to the ultrasound treatment.

"While these results are preliminary and more research is needed, they strongly suggest that the diffusion-weighted MR technique provides images that show functional changes and the extent of fibroid damage from treatment. DWI may be useful for monitoring the effects of ultrasound treatment on uterine fibroids," says Michael Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology and oncology at the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science at Johns Hopkins. "The results also suggest that this imaging technique may be useful for monitoring other focused ultrasound treatments for lesions in the prostate, and breast, when available." The other co-authors of the study were Hyun "Kevin" Kim, M.D. and Edward Herskovits, M.D., Ph.D. This study was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Gary Stephenson | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Münster researchers make a fly’s heartbeat visible / Software automatically recognizes pulse
12.03.2018 | Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

nachricht 3-D-written model to provide better understanding of cancer spread
05.03.2018 | Purdue University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>