Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New motor system impairment diagnosing tool

Researchers from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid are developing a tool that will allow doctors to easily evaluate the degree and type of the tremors caused in the upper limbs by some neurological disorders.

The DIMETER system makes it easier for doctors and other health professionals to objectively evaluate the tremors exhibited in the hands and fingers of patients affected by some disorders that impair their motor skills, such as Parkinson, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

To make such measurements, DIMETER uses an electromechanical apparatus that is controlled by the hand or finger of the affected patient and registers the movement and the forces that are generated. Using this device and a computer monitor, doctors execute a series of virtual static and motion tests, such as trying to keep the hand at rest, or describing a set movement, like a straight line or a spiral. In any of these tests a weight can be added to the patient to evaluate the effect on the tremor while the system constantly monitors and records each movement.

The computer gathers the data and processes it to provide the doctor with the information needed for the patient’s evaluation in a numerical or graphical format to the level of detail required. This report is objective and precise and enables doctors to adjust their diagnosis of the condition and monitor the progression of the disease, or the effectiveness of the treatment.

Medical diagnosis tool

The new device, patented by the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, has been co-developed by the researchers Antonio Barrientos and Roberto González from the Grupo de Investigación en Robótica y Cibernética of the UPM, with the colaboration of the Centro Estatal de Autonomía Personal y Ayudas Técnicas (CEAPAT) of the IMSERSO.

This tool, designed for medical consults, not only provides information of the type and degree of the tremor, but helps by offering a diagnostic. This way doctors have a corroboration of the diagnosis and treatment for the patient ensuring they are cared for effectively. Moreover, the system collates accurate data of each patient’s case, helping the investigation and improving the diagnoses and treatment of the diseases that present such symptoms.

The DIMETER system has already been used at the Ramón y Cajal hospital to undertake a study of the effect that the Deep Brain Stimulation technique has on the tremors. The use of this system has also helped the development of a new system called ACORTE that uses the processed data from the DIMETER to enable people suffering from tremors to use a conventional computer mouse.

Ciencia y Sociedad | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Münster researchers make a fly’s heartbeat visible / Software automatically recognizes pulse
12.03.2018 | Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

nachricht 3-D-written model to provide better understanding of cancer spread
05.03.2018 | Purdue University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

Im Focus: Radar for navigation support from autonomous flying drones

At the ILA Berlin, hall 4, booth 202, Fraunhofer FHR will present two radar sensors for navigation support of drones. The sensors are valuable components in the implementation of autonomous flying drones: they function as obstacle detectors to prevent collisions. Radar sensors also operate reliably in restricted visibility, e.g. in foggy or dusty conditions. Due to their ability to measure distances with high precision, the radar sensors can also be used as altimeters when other sources of information such as barometers or GPS are not available or cannot operate optimally.

Drones play an increasingly important role in the area of logistics and services. Well-known logistic companies place great hope in these compact, aerial...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

International Virtual Reality Conference “IEEE VR 2018” comes to Reutlingen, Germany

08.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Wandering greenhouse gas

16.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>