Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Minimally invasive treatment of myomas

04.03.2011
Syngo Embolization Guidance application from Siemens makes tumor therapy easier on the patient

Siemens Healthcare has added new functions to Syngo Embolization Guidance to simplify and accelerate the minimally invasive embolization of benign tumors such as myomas. The new version of the imaging software assists with treatment planning and delivery and makes it possible to check treatment outcomes. Syngo Embolization Guidance can speed up interventions as compared with previous embolization procedures, meaning that both contrast medium and dose can be reduced. This makes the occlusion of the blood vessels supplying the myoma easier on the patient than conventional methods.

The new version of Syngo Embolization Guidance from Siemens enables physicians to mark both the myoma and the blood vessels supplying the tumor on the pre-intervention CT (computed tomography) or MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) images. The software calculates the tumor volume and the access path to the myoma for the catheter automatically and shows both in the 3D planning image. Superimposing this image on the live fluoroscopic image during the intervention enables the radiologist to position the catheter easier than has previously been the case and largely removes the need for contrast medium, as the path is already marked and segmented in the 3D image. Treating myomas with Syngo Embolization Guidance is thus easier on the patient. Myomas (uterine leiomyomas) are benign thickenings of the myometrium. The Robert Koch Institute explains in its reporting to the German Federal Health Monitoring System in 2007 that myomas occur in significant numbers in around one third of women from the age of 35 onward in our part of the world1.

The traditional technique for myoma treatment involves the surgical removal of the tumors in an operation. A new minimally invasive method involving the occlusion of blood vessels has become established over recent years. Known as embolization, this technique sees a catheter inserted into the patient's vascular system through a very small access point, usually in the groin, and guided to the tumor. The catheter is navigated through the blood stream using a fluoroscopy system. The position of the catheter in the patient's body is displayed on screen in 2D images from an angiography unit, with contrast medium helping to make the area of interest stand out from the surrounding tissue. Key to this technique is the ability to bring the catheter into a position from which the blood vessels supplying the tumor can be occluded. Once the catheter is in place, emboli, for example very small particles of plastic, are injected directly into the blood vessels that supply the myoma until the blood supply to the benign tumor has been stopped. Deprived of essential nutrients and oxygen, the myomas shrink and eventually die.

The product mentioned herein is not commercially available. Due to regulatory reasons its future availability cannot be guaranteed.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world’s largest healthcare solution providers and a leading manufacturer and service provider in the fields of medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, hospital information technology and hearing instruments. It offers solutions covering the entire supply chain under one roof - from prevention and early detection to diagnosis and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows oriented toward the most important clinical pictures, Siemens also strives to make healthcare faster, better and, at the same time, less expensive. Siemens Healthcare currently has some 48,000 employees worldwide and is present throughout the world. During fiscal 2010 (up to September 30) the Sector posted sales worth 12.4 billion euros and profits of around 750 million euros.

1 Robert Koch Institute, Ed.: Vol. 37 Gebärmuttererkrankungen [Hysteropathy], from the series "Gesundheitsberichterstattung des Bundes" [German Federal Health Monitoring], Berlin, January 2007

Marion Bludszuweit | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Surgery involving ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure
24.05.2018 | Queen Mary University of London

nachricht XXL computed tomography: a new dimension in X-ray analysis
17.05.2018 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Powerful IT security for the car of the future – research alliance develops new approaches

The more electronics steer, accelerate and brake cars, the more important it is to protect them against cyber-attacks. That is why 15 partners from industry and academia will work together over the next three years on new approaches to IT security in self-driving cars. The joint project goes by the name Security For Connected, Autonomous Cars (SecForCARs) and has funding of €7.2 million from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Infineon is leading the project.

Vehicles already offer diverse communication interfaces and more and more automated functions, such as distance and lane-keeping assist systems. At the same...

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Flow probes from the 3D printer

25.05.2018 | Machine Engineering

Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found

25.05.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>