Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rotary engine technology takes off in general aviation

25.07.2007
General aviation is currently in a high-growth phase and is desperately looking for new aircraft engine technologies. The four-stroke piston engine technology used in the majority of planes involved in general aviation dates back 60 years.

So, while designs are well proven, motors require some 70 or 80 moving parts and still use 100-octane low-leaded (100 LL) fuel that has long been displaced by kerosene for commercial aircraft. Thanks to EUREKA project E! 2743 KERO, advances in combustion chamber design and electronic management systems are making it possible to develop a reliable rotary engine for small planes running on standard kerosene jet fuel.

Swiss project leader Mistral Engines saw a major market for a safer, more reliable motor that could be easily adapted to any model of light aircraft and able to run on industry standard fuel. The design is based on the Wankel rotary engine developed in Germany in the 1930s but emerged at the wrong time. So far, it has only really been developed and commercialised by Japanese car maker Mazda in its RX-8 and previous models.

Safety and reliability are key factors in aviation. Advantages of the design include excellent reliability as there are few moving parts, a high power-to-weight ratio, compactness and smooth running compared with conventional piston-engine designs. Moreover, the engine will run on widely available standard commercial aviation fuels. The Wankel engine has a rotor instead of reciprocating pistons, doing away with any need for crankshafts, pistons and springs and reducing the number of moving parts to only two or three. Modern electronics has now made it possible to overcome timing and injection control complications, resulting also in similar fuel consumption figures to piston engines.

Several partners are involved in the EUREKA project. The Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) is studying the best combustion conditions for the kerosene in terms of combustion-chamber design, injection and ignition. “We are also now developing a special exhaust silencer with the EPFL to limit the noise, using active and passive noise- reduction technologies able to work at very high temperatures,” adds Geles. “This has not been done before.”

EUREKA labelling played a key role in obtaining funding for the KERO project. “While we managed to start the work with ‘pocket money’”, explains Claude Geles, chairman of Mistral. “EUREKA labelling enabled us to put together the10 million euro in private equity financing that we needed to see the project through to a fully certified product ready for manufacture.” Most of the technical problems have already been overcome –one problem still being tackled is pushing away the detonation, or pre-ignition, limit. Nevertheless, Geles predicts full FAA certification within 18 months of the project ending. The sky is then literally the limit!

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/inaction/viewSuccessStory.do?docid=3409978

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht A helping (Sens)Hand
11.04.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>