Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

LIER sets companies on road to EU safety targets

16.08.2005


LIER (INRETS Road Equipment Test Laboratory) of France uses state-of-the-art technology to accredit road-safety devices. Clients use the services of LIER to develop and improve their road-safety products with the aim of obtaining both French and foreign accreditation, especially with respect to the new EN1317 European standard.



LIER is the European leader in the regulatory crash testing of different forms of road-side safety barriers or VRS (Vehicle Restraint Systems). It is the only laboratory in France to conduct tests on road-side restraint devices (guard rails, crash cushions, guard-rail end terminals, etc.) as well as any other equipment located on the sides of roads and motorways that is dedicated to protecting road users. These devices, subjected to numerous tests and inspections, are primarily intended to avoid damage to – and the consequences of – a vehicle accidentally leaving the road, and also to protect both those people travelling in the vehicle in question and the other road users in the immediate vicinity. Clients include road-side equipment manufacturers, designers, distributors or installers, who most often belong to the steelmaking, building and public works sectors, but also to the plastics and wood sectors.

Accredited by the COFRAC (Comité Français d’Accréditation – French Accreditation Committee) for the ISO/CEI 17025 quality standard (general measures concerning calibration and test laboratories), LIER uses an in-house quality-assurance system and has set itself strict standards regarding the skills of its personnel as well as the laboratory’s impartiality and independence. With more than 100 impact tests carried out each year on its site, LIER’s experience is so far based on approximately 950 tests performed, using cars, buses or lorries of between 10 and 38 tonnes.


During the tests, the vehicle, whose speed is monitored by GPS, is guided by a rail inserted into the road surface, thereby guaranteeing a very high degree of approach-angle precision. A remote-control unit operating from a chase vehicle enables the vehicle’s brakes to be activated after impact if need be. In addition to these means, LIER has a large stock of acceleration and angular velocity sensors in order to record all the test data. All the tests are filmed by high-speed digital cameras operating at a speed of 500 frames per second. The reports are drafted in several languages and sent on to clients in the form of CDs or DVDs.

For more specific tests, LIER also possesses instrumented, anthropomorphic test dummies, such as the Hybrid III, so as to analyse precisely the real protection afforded by the various devices to vehicle passengers. In addition to the biomechanical data recorded on the dummy during the impact, an on-board camera makes it possible to analyse the kinematics and the dummy’s interaction with its environment.

Kate Ambler | alfa
Further information:
http://www.infotechfrance.com/london

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

Im Focus: A transistor of graphene nanoribbons

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Making fuel out of thick air

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>