Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Delft researcher develops design-rules for transport networks

25.09.2002


Large changes unnecessary for multimodal transport



Multimodal transport is not in need of redesigned networks, rather of well designed ones. This is one of the conclusions from the PhD research of Rob van Nes, who will defend his thesis on Wednesday 25 September at TU Delft. “A highway with too many on and off ramps actually becomes a main road. This might be handy, but it is not effective.” Van Nes, who carried out his research at TRAIL research school, laid the theoretical foundation for something which many people already suspected.

Multimodal transport is often seen as an interesting possibility to solve the current traffic problems such as traffic jams, unreachable areas and negative environmental effects. Combining the use of, for example, cars, trains and buses on certain routes, could emphasise the strengths and diminish the weaknesses of the network. Van Nes: “Multimodal transport is very useful, but the important question is actually: what exactly does an effective multimodal network look like? Is a different from the networks that we have at the moment, or are the connections between the networks more important?” According to Van Nes, two points are of great importance for an effective multimodal network: hierarchy and concentration in space.


Using mathematical models, Van Nes showed that multimodal networks are pointless unless one sticks to the hierarchy of the network. Van Nes: “In the hierarchy, a highway stands above a main road. The highway is for longer distances at higher speeds, a main road is for shorter distances and lower speeds.” If one does not maintain a clear separation, the result is an inefficient network. Van Nes: “A highway with many on and off ramps becomes a main road. It gets used for shorter distances, it becomes busier and the speed decreases.”

The concentration in space is also very important. Van Nes uses calculations to show that a public transport network can only work if there is a demand for transport. “If in a certain part of the city, there is no clear demand for transport, it is of little use to build higher level networks (fast tram/subway) alongside a the bus network in that area,” says Van Nes, “It is better to choose one of the two. This saves space, and especially money.” Van Nes has laid theoretical foundation for something that many people already suspected. Van Nes: “We can now provide proper arguments as to why we must build networks systematically, and on what points we should concentrate when trying to stimulate multimodal transport.”

Maarten van der Sanden | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tudelft.nl

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>