Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Off-Hour Truck Deliveries in Manhattan Reduce Traffic, Empower Business Owners

20.09.2013
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the New York City Department of Transportation Seeing Success With U.S. Department of Transportation Study To Shift Daytime Truck Deliveries to Outside Normal Business Hours

A federal study led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is helping make Manhattan streets cleaner, less congested, and more profitable for businesses by shifting daytime delivery truck traffic to after normal business hours.


Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

A federal study led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is helping make Manhattan streets cleaner, less congested, and more profitable for businesses by shifting daytime delivery truck traffic to after normal business hours.

Rensselaer Professor Jose Holguín-Veras is leading this innovative program in conjunction with the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT). Since launching in 2011, the program—called NYC deliverEASE— has enlisted nearly 150 restaurants, grocery stores, retailers, and other businesses in Manhattan to accept their freight deliveries between the off-hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. instead of during normal business hours. The feedback from companies, which received a $2,000 cash incentive to participate in the program, has been overwhelmingly positive.

Holguín-Veras said this new model of unassisted off-hour deliveries—truck drivers use keys to drop off goods at the store or restaurant and lock up afterward—benefits participating businesses, the delivery companies, and the overall economic health and vibrancy of Manhattan. Participating companies range from small restaurants and delis to larger companies. Organizations already participating in NYC deliverEASE include: Sysco, Whole Foods Markets, Wakefern, Gristedes Supermarkets, the Waldorf Astoria, Chefs Warehouse, The Beverage Works, CVS, New Deal Logistics, the Grand Central Partnership, the Downtown Alliance, and the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce.

“Restaurant and grocery store owners can easily run out of products, because they don’t know if their food deliveries are going to arrive at 9 a.m. or 3 p.m. So, just in case, they often buy extra, which is inefficient and expensive,” Holguín-Veras said. “With unassisted off-hour deliveries, they know their fresh products are going to be there waiting for them every morning. This consistent, reliable delivery pattern improves the ability of business owners to manage their supply chain, which in turn allows them to be more efficient and better serve customers.”

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) is funding this program. NYCDOT and Rutgers University are partnering with Rensselaer on this project.

Several leaders from participating business have commented on the program:

• “Whole Foods Market Union Square has enjoyed the ability to take deliveries in overnight, serve our customers better, and enhance our commitment to the environment through more efficient trucking operations.” – Mary Snow Thurber, Director of Receiving, Whole Foods Market Northeast Region

• “The off-hours delivery program . . .[is] a win-win as business owners and citizens will both realize real immediate benefits.” – Nick Kenner, Managing Partner, Just Salad LLC

• “Sysco has been involved in this program since its inception, because we want to support programs that improve quality of life for people in NYC by reducing traffic congestion.” Bobby Heim, – Vice President of Operations, Sysco Metro New York

NYC deliverEASE Program also benefits the delivery companies, Holguín-Veras said. During business hours, delivery trucks spend an average of two hours at each stop. With unassisted off-hour deliveries, drivers were able to park directly in front or back of the business, and the average time spent at each stop was only 30 minutes. Additionally, average travel speeds at night are twice as fast as during the daytime.

If just 6 percent of New York deliveries shifted to the off hours, the difference to livability in the city would be substantial, with less congestion, visible display windows in retail establishments, and open street space during daytime hours, Holguín-Veras said. Such a 6 percent shift to off-hour deliveries also could result in a reduction of carbon monoxide emissions of more than 100 tons each year. All of these benefits add up to less daytime truck traffic on Manhattan’s busy streets, which makes it easier for tourists and local residents to visit and patronize downtown businesses.

Holguín-Veras is the William Howard Hart Professor at Rensselaer, and a member of the university’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is also director of the Center for Infrastructure, Transportation, and the Environment at Rensselaer.

Companies interested in learning more about the program are encouraged to contact the research team, which can develop customized plans for businesses. Additional project details, participant testimonials, and contact information may be found at: http://cite.rpi.edu/projects

For more information on Holguín-Veras’ research at Rensselaer, visit:

• Peer to Peer Exchange Program Webinar on the Lessons from the Off Hour Delivery Program in New York City

https://coe-sufs.org/wordpress/peer-to-peer-exchange-program/webinar01/

• Center of Excellence for Sustainable Urban Freight System
www.coe-sufs.org
• Jose Holguín-Veras Home Page
http://www.transp.rpi.edu/~jhvweb/
• Rensselaer Center for Infrastructure, Transportation, and the Environment
http://transp.rpi.edu/~CITE/index.shtml
• NYC Department of Transportation Recognizes Project Led by Rensselaer
http://news.rpi.edu/update.do?artcenterkey=2747
• Switching Gears to Greener Transportation
http://green.rpi.edu/archives/traffic/
• Tax Incentives and High-Tech Tools for Night Owls
http://news.rpi.edu/update.do?artcenterkey=2323
Contact
Michael Mullaney
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY
518-276-6161
mullam@rpi.edu
www.rpi.edu/news
Visit the Rensselaer research and discovery blog: http://approach.rpi.edu
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/RPInews

Michael Mullaney | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.rpi.edu

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>