Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Suitable Protein Tags for Nanoscopy

29.01.2016

Scientists of the Göttingen Cluster of Excellence CNMPB and the EMBL describe efficient fluorescence tag for super-resolution microscopy. Published in ACS Nano.

Modern optical technologies such as super-resolution nanoscopy enable to exactly image small structures and molecular processes, therefore, providing a fascinating view into living cells. To visualize such processes in the nanometer range, cellular structures of interest have to be efficiently labeled.


Protein labeling with aptamers (left) better displays the shape of endosomes than labeling with larger antibody probes (right).

Felipe Opazo / CNMPB

Fluorescent proteins are routinely used as convenient tags in conventional microscopy but their use for nanoscopy has been questioned. Scientists of the Göttingen Cluster of Excellence and DFG Research Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain (CNMPB) and of the EMBL in Heidelberg now investigated the application of fluorescent protein tags on the organization of proteins.

The findings of the team around Nobel Prize awardee Stefan W. Hell (Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen), Edward Lemke (EMBL, Heidelberg) and Silvio O. Rizzoli (University Medical Center Göttingen) proved the general use of fluorescent protein tags to be reliable tools in nanoscopy and for biomedical research.

The results, recently published in ACS Nano, specially indicate fluorescence labeling based on unnatural amino acids to be a reliable alternative for labeling.

Original publication: Vreja IC, Nikić I, Göttfert F, Bates M, Kröhnert K, Outeiro TF, Hell SW, Lemke EA, Rizzoli SO (2015) Super-resolution Microscopy of Clickable Amino Acids Reveals the Effects of Fluorescent Protein tagging on Protein Assemblies. ACS NANO, 9(11): 11034-41.

Nanoscopy, or lens-based super-resolution microscopy, is a fairly new technique that enables to observe molecules and biomolecules with a resolution of 10-30 nm and to moreover analyze whole protein complexes. For their development and the implementation of super-resolution nanoscopy coauthor Stefan W. Hell, has been awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 together with Betzig and William E. Moerner. For labeling and visualization procedures fluorescent protein tags are used.

Due to their relatively large size these labels often tend to form clusters, thus, producing artifacts in nanoscopic recordings. „Regarding the ease of use and their compatibility, we are specially interested in genetically encoded fluorescent protein tags, which can be introduced into living cells by gene manipulation. Their use in nanoscopy should therefore be carefully investigated“, senior author Silvio O. Rizzoli explains.

The scientists focused on 26 proteins, which are known to form various types of multi molecular arrangements and compared their nanoscale organization with or without fluorescent tag. The proteins were labeled with the smallest tag that is currently available, namely the unnatural amino acid propargyl-L-lysine (PRK) by insertion into the coding sequence of a target protein.

For visualization with a super-resolution microscope, synthetic fluorophores were coupled to the PRK via “click chemistry”. This fast and selective organic reaction is an established a standard tool for labeling and modification of biomolecules.

The researchers subsequently compared the nanoscopic organization of labeled and non-labeled proteins using ground-state depletion followed by individual molecule return microscopy (GSDIM) and stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. Apart from six proteins that turned out to be slightly adversely affected, the FP-tagged and non-FP-tagged proteins formed similar molecular arrangements. In total, the scientists assessed the use of unnatural amino acids as suitable markers for nanoscopy.

“Other research groups should now also test this labeling technique to see whether their target proteins are affected by the fluorescent protein tags or not,” first author Ingrid Vreja recommends. Together with their findings, the authors suggest an easily implementable detailed protocol that other researchers may use for testing and/or labeling their own proteins of interest.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.rizzoli-lab.de Homepage of the Department of Prof. Dr. Silvio O. Rizzoli
http://www.cnmpb.de CNMPB - Cluster of Excellence and DFG Research Center for Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain

Dr. Heike Conrad | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in space
26.04.2018 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht Multifunctional bacterial microswimmer able to deliver cargo and destroy itself
26.04.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Why we need erasable MRI scans

New technology could allow an MRI contrast agent to 'blink off,' helping doctors diagnose disease

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

World's smallest optical implantable biodevice

26.04.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in space

26.04.2018 | Life Sciences

First Li-Fi-product with technology from Fraunhofer HHI launched in Japan

26.04.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>