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Strategy outlined for growing bioenergy while protecting wildlife

05.10.2009
Careful planning, together with the use of feedstocks from perennial-dominated prairie, could minimize the adverse effects of expanding bioenergy use on wildlife

A study described in the October issue of BioScience identifies diverse native prairie as holding promise for yielding bioenergy feedstocks while minimizing harm to wildlife.

Harvesting diverse prairie, which is dominated by perennial plants, could avoid adverse environmental effects associated with expanding cultivation of corn for ethanol, such as loss of wildlife habitat and high fertilizer runoff. It could also avoid the threat of invasion posed by cultivation of exotic biofuel crops.

The study, by Joseph E. Fargione of the Nature Conservancy and nine coauthors, explores how choices between a variety of current and emerging bioenergy feedstocks and production practices could affect wildlife as demand for biofuels increases. The growing US use of biofuels—so far, almost entirely ethanol made from corn—has contributed to a sharp reduction of the amount of grassland that landowners had enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program. The conversion of grassland to corn cropland has most likely harmed grassland-dependent wildlife, and a congressional mandate to further step up biofuel production in coming years will add to this pressure.

Yet feedstocks for bioenergy (which includes biomass burning and gasification as well as liquid fuels) vary widely in their potential effects on wildlife. Because bioenergy requires relatively large amounts of land, the loss of wildlife habitat is of particular concern. Use of alternative feedstocks such as wastes, agricultural residues, and cover crops, as well as native perennials harvested in a way that is compatible with wildlife, could produce bioenergy with less-damaging consequences for wildlife. Cultivation of algae could also potentially yield bioenergy without loss of wildlife habitat. Fargione and his coauthors point out that detailed comparisons of yields from different feedstocks are urgently needed so that practical bioenergy strategies favorable to wildlife can be devised.

After noon EST on October 1 and for the remainder of the month, the full text of the article will be available for free download through the copy of this Press Release available at http://www.aibs.org/bioscience-press-releases/

BioScience, published 11 times per year, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles covering a wide range of biological fields, with a focus on "Organisms from Molecules to the Environment." The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an umbrella organization for professional scientific societies and organizations that are involved with biology. It represents some 200 member societies and organizations with a combined membership of about 250,000.

The complete list of research articles in the October 2009 issue of BioScience is as follows:

Dissecting Tropical Plant Diversity with Forest Plots and a Molecular Toolkit.
Christopher W. Dick and W. John Kress
Molecular Tools for Discovering the Secrets of Diatoms.
Anastasia Saade and Chris Bowler
Bioenergy and Wildlife: Threats and Opportunities for Grassland Conservation.
Joseph E. Fargione, Thomas R. Cooper, David J. Flaspohler, Jason Hill, Clarence Lehman, Tim McCoy, Scott McLeod, Erik J. Nelson, Karen S. Oberhauser, and David Tilman
The Rise of the Mesopredator.
Laura R. Prugh, Chantal J. Stoner, Clinton W. Epps, William T. Bean, William J. Ripple, Andrea S. Laliberte, and Justin S. Brashares
Conceptions of Evolution among Science Graduate Students.
T. Ryan Gregory and Cameron A. J. Ellis
Ten Myths about Charles Darwin.
Kevin Padian

Jennifer Williams | EurekAlert!
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http://www.aibs.org

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