Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene Inheritance Patterns Influence Age of Diagnosis in BRCA Families

13.12.2011
Women who inherit the cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 from their paternal lineage may get a diagnosis a decade earlier than those women who carry the cancer genes from their mother and her ancestors, according to a new study by researchers at the North Shore-LIJ Health System's Monter Cancer Center in Lake Success, NY. The findings were reported on Thursday, Dec. 8, at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Iuliana Shapira, MD,director of cancer genetics, and her colleagues conducted a retrospective review of 130 breast or ovarian cancer patients with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. They chose only those patients who knew the parent of origin. In other words, they could follow along their family tree to see where the breast cancer gene originated from. Some of their families had their own genetic tests done. For others, it was a matter of following the family pedigree.

As expected, a person had a 50-50 chance of getting a mutant BRCA gene from their mother or their father’s branch that carried the mutation. It is an autosomal dominant mutation. Looking at the family maps revealed some surprising findings. Contrary to the notion that the BRCA mutations are associated more commonly with Ashkenazi Jews, the scientists found that the BRCA mutations were also in families of Irish and Jamaican descent.

“No one had ever conducted a study to look at the parent-of-origin effects,” said Dr. Shapira. “Genetic diseases may display parent-of-origin effects. In such cases, the risk depends on the specific parent or origin allele. Cancer penetrance in mutations carriers may be determined by the parent origin of BRCA mutation.”

They analyzed 1,889 consecutive (136 ovarian + 1753 breast) breast (BrCa) or ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients presenting for treatment at the Monter Cancer Center between 2007 and 2010. In 130 patients with BRCA 1 or 2 mutations the parent of origin for the mutation was known. Of the 130 patients, two had both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated paternally inherited disease and were excluded from this analysis. Of the breast cancer patients: 28 patients had paternal and 29 had maternal BRCA1 mutations, 24 had paternal and 21 had maternal BRCA 2 mutations. Of the ovarian cancer patients, six had paternal and 10 had maternal BRCA1 mutations; seven had paternal and three had maternal BRCA2 mutations.

In carriers of BRCA mutations, the mean age at diagnosis for ovarian cancer was 51 (range 21-70) and for breast cancer was 43 (range 24-78). But when they compared the mean age at diagnosis in the maternal versus paternal inheritance, they were surprised to find that breast cancer patients with a BRCA1 maternal inheritance, the age of diagnosis was on average around 45. By comparison, women with BRCA1 paternal inheritance were diagnosed around 38. For breast cancer BRCA2 maternal inheritance, the average age of diagnosis was 50 compared to 41 years old for those with a BRCA2 paternal inheritance.

There was no significant difference between paternal and maternal age of ovarian cancer diagnosis of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.“If this observation is duplicated in larger cohorts the results will have important implications for recommendation of surgical risk reduction in BRCA mutation carriers,” said Dr. Shapira. “That would mean that doctors might think about watching and waiting in young woman with BRCA mutations inherited from her mother’s family and being more aggressive in young women who inherited the mutation from their father’s side.”

Jamie Talan | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.nshs.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>