Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Stop looking for parking spaces: magnetic field sensor can recognize vehicles

15.04.2010
When drivers look for unoccupied parking lots in front of large shopping malls, they often have to drive in circles and spend minutes. Researchers at Saarland University demonstrate how to make the process shorter.

They have developed easy-to-install magnetic field sensors. Unoccupied parking lot locations can be presented on a display. This monitor system has been applied at airports and it can also be used for improving city traffic guidance, so traffic jams before traffic lights will be reduced.

Researchers will demonstrate application possibilities from 19 to 23 April at Hannover Messe at Saarland Research stand (Hall 2, Stand C44).

Each vehicle slightly deforms its surrounding earth's magnetic field due to its metallic components and electronic devices. Magnetic field sensors can detect these small changes. Uwe Hartmann, Professor of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, explains: "These sensors are very sensitive and they can also recognize vehicles at a large distance. In contrast to surveillance cameras, which are influenced by fog or rain, magnetic field sensors are unaffected by weather conditions." One sensor plus necessary electronics is also comparatively cheap and its power consumption is low, so magnetic field sensors can be used in systems to monitor large areas.

In parking garages or on large surfaces in front of shopping malls, magnetic field sensors can precisely recognize locations of unoccupied parking lots. Large displays present the information to customers and there are still places for advertisements on displays. "Also traffic flow can be monitored by these sensors. They can be integrated into traffic light systems, because they can easily identify the vehicle speed", Hartmann says. The researcher sees an additional application in shipping. In this case, magnetic field sensors recognize whether a ship passes the door of a large sluice or not.

In a pilot project, on-road tests of magnetic field sensors have been carried out at Frankfurt, Saarbrücken-Ensheim and Thessaloniki airports. Hartmann warns, "Every year there are several hundred real or near accidents at airports worldwide, due to collisions of aircrafts with other aircrafts or ground vehicles." Magnetic field sensors will prevent those aircrafts from moving too close on their ways to taxiways. "Especially for areas between buildings, where ground radars are not effective or even impossible to achieve, magnetic field sensors can be equipped," the Saarbrücken physicist explains.

In the research project together with Fraport at Frankfurt airport, various applications of magnetic field sensors to maintain safety have been investigated. In this area, further development is still needed before market launch.

Corresponding person:

Prof. Dr. Uwe Hartmann
Chair for Nanostructure Research and Nanotechnology
Saarland University
Tel. +49 (0)681 / 302 3799
Tel. +49 (0)511 / 89 497101 (telephone in stand)
E-Mail: u.hartmann@mx.uni-saarland.de
Information for radio journalists: You can make telephone interviews in studio quality with researchers at Saarland University by using radio-ISDN-codec. Please directly contact the press office +49 (0)681/302-3601 for your interview wish.

Friederike Meyer zu Tittingdorf | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-saarland.de/fak7/hartmann/
http://www.ismael-project.net
http://www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New epidemic management system combats monkeypox outbreak in Nigeria
15.12.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses
13.12.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>