Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Games enthusiasts go quackers over new technology

10.04.2007
Cutting edge technology designed to help remove nuclear waste has inspired scientists in Sheffield to go quackers!

Enterprising scientists at Sheffield Hallam University have been showing their softer side by using a complex mathematical model designed to simulate how materials behave to create the most realistic flowing water ever seen in a duck inspired computer game!

Games enthusiasts throughout the world can test their skills on the new game - Super Rub-A-Dub - thanks to the latest developments in simulation from the University’s Materials and Engineering Research Institute.

The game, which features a swimming gaggle of ducks, has been developed by Sheffield games company Sumo Digital and is one of around thirty which will be available on Sony’s newly launched download site.

Sheffield Hallam’s involvement in the game began when the Materials Modelling Group, headed by Professor Chris Care, realised their research had led them to something which could have a major impact on helping improve realism in games.

He said: "Much of our work involves developing computer programmes which simulate the way different materials actually behave, enabling much greater understanding of their properties and providing detailed information to aid product development in a wide range of industry sectors.

"Our Thinking Water technology is one such programme which offers a highly efficient means of simulating fluid flow. It’s a technology which has already been used in work with major companies such as BNFL and Rolls Royce, but we started to think about other ways in which it could have an impact and that’s when we hit upon the idea that it could bring something quite new to the games industry.

"As our use of algorithms in research became more efficient and games consoles were becoming increasingly more powerful, it became clear that there could be a mutually beneficial link-up, and that’s why we approached Sumo."

The team at Sheffield Hallam responsible for the development of Thinking Water is Dr Richard Webster, Dr Ian Halliday and Professor Chris Care. Their background is in mathematics and theoretical physics, so the development into games software is a new departure, which has allowed them to use their knowledge of physics to create more realistic games environments for the next generation of games consoles.

The end result of that initial contact with Sumo, one year later, is Super Rub-A-Dub, a game in which a mother duck is guided by the game player, using a Sixaxis controller, round an extremely realistic tub of water – with ripples and reflected light – in her attempts to free her offspring from the bubbles and lead them safely home, whilst avoiding a range of obstacles.

Carl Cavers, Chief Operating Officer at Sumo, said that working with Sheffield Hallam had helped them to move the game’s realistic features up a gear: "When the University first presented the technology to us we thought this is cool and we could see opportunities to use this in a video game. Our design team fleshed out a few ideas and a year later we have the result"

The research team at Sheffield Hallam now hopes that their innovative approach could lead to further involvement with the games industry.

"As the demands from the entertainments industry for ever increased realism grow, this kind of technological innovation will become increasingly important in future developments," said Chris. "When you add that to our growing reputation as a provider of taught courses in games development at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, you can see that Sheffield Hallam is rapidly becoming a significant force within this growing sector."

Suzanne Lightfoot | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New silicon structure opens the gate to quantum computers
12.12.2017 | Princeton University

nachricht PhoxTroT: Optical Interconnect Technologies Revolutionized Data Centers and HPC Systems
11.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration IZM

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>