Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Biometric identification for on-line and off-line signature recognition

Day by day, natural and secure access to interconnected systems is becoming more and more important. There is also a strong need to verify identity of people in a fast, easy to use and user-friendly way.

In this context, handwritten signature is one of the most traditionally used and most socially accepted biometric identification ways. The PhD. Thesis of Juan Jose Igarza Ugaldea, from the University of the Basque Country, presents proposals for the two ways of handwritten signature biometric identification: on-line and off-line signature recognition.

To face this challenge, we have developed a wide data base, including enough signatures from several anonymous signers and skilled forgeries. The collected database is multimodal as it also includes fingerprints and voices from all users.

We have carried out a State of The Art in biometric recognition at different levels, starting from a wide vision of biometric recognition, evolving through the handwriting recognition and ending in both ways of handwritten signatures.

Our proposal for on-line signature recognition is a system based on processing local features (coordinates, velocities, accelerations, pressure and pen tilt) by using global features (center of mass of ink and principal inertia axes) as a reference system. We propose a simple scaling algorithm for signature time normalization that is applicable to every local feature. We have limited the amount of local features to feed the Hidden Markov Models to nine, in order to balance the required security level and the processing and storing capacities. Using six stated LR-HMMs we have obtained equal error rates similar to those observed in the state-of-the-art.

We have studied the reference system that is most suitable for the alignment of signatures and we have proposed the reference system located in the center of mass of ink using the principal inertia axes as orientation, after concluding that using signatures first points coordinates and slope as an alignment reference becomes a source of noise. The new reference system provides a better alignment, improving the equal error rate significantly, especially when using only coordinates.

Our proposals for off-line signature recognition consist in two systems based on using the LR-HMM technique, which is so useful for dynamic systems. The models are fed on spatially ordered point sequences and geometrical “false-dynamic” derivative features. The goal of those proposals is to extend LR-HMMs to the field of static or off-line signature processing using results provided by image connectivity analysis, which separates images in connected components known as “blobs”, each one made up of a cluster of adjacent pixels of the same nature.

Two different ways of generating models are discussed, depending on the way that blobs provided by the connectivity analysis are ordered. In the first proposed method, blobs are ordered according to their perimeter length. In the second proposal, the sorting criterion is based in the natural reading order. Results obtained in different experiments are presented, showing that the proposed methods provide verification rates similar to those observed during the study of the state-of-the-art. The models based on the second criterion are especially adequate for the Latin writing in which signatures have been written.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Fraunhofer FIT joins Facebook's Telecom Infra Project
25.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions
21.10.2016 | Stanford University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

The gene of autumn colours

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Polymer scaffolds build a better pill to swallow

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>