Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sandia demonstrates next generation high performance computing cluster

18.09.2003


Configuration featuring InfiniBand architecture and PCI Express technology delivers performance breakthrough


An early photo of the 128-node cluster, built by Linux Networx, that will be housed at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, Calif. The machine is expected to be among the world’s top-performing systems and will be used by Sandia scientists for ongoing research and development projects.



Sandia National Laboratories today announced at the Intel Developer Forum it will demonstrate an Intel-based next-generation, High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster, the first such cluster to utilize PCI Express visualization systems.

The demonstration will run PCI Express Ethernet and Graphics adapters supplied by ATI on servers supplied by Linux Networx and Celestica. It will also make use of InfiniBand architecture, a new Input/Output standard network technology that holds promise for improved performance of High-Performance Computing (HPC) clusters at a lower cost.


The InfiniBand cluster demonstration utilizes 16 computers, containing a combination of Intel® XeonTM and Intel® ItaniumTM 2 processors and utilizing InfiniBand Host Channel Adapters, configured together within a 10 Gbps InfiniBand fabric. The cluster uses the Linux operating system. "We look forward to working with Intel and others to evaluate the advantages PCI Express and InfiniBand architecture’s low-latency, high bandwidth interconnect technology," said Matt Leininger, a computational scientist at Sandia National Laboratories.

"Open interconnect standards like InfiniBand architecture and PCI Express for Intel-based systems provide outstanding performance for world class HPC clusters," said Jim Pappas, director of initiative marketing for Intel’s Enterprise Platform Group. "Sandia National Laboratories has a long history in developing some of the most powerful clusters on the planet. We look forward to working closely with them in testing their InfiniBand cluster."

The InfiniBand architecture simplifies and speeds server-to-server connections and links to other server-related systems in such areas as remote storage and networking devices. InfiniBand architecture’s easier connectivity, reduced latency, improved bandwidth and enhanced interoperability features increase the performance, reliability and scalability of Intel-based servers to meet the growth needs of emerging e-Business data centers.

Sandia, said Leininger, will soon begin testing the performance and scalability of the current-generation cluster. The 128-node machine, expected to be among the world’s top systems, is being built by Linux Networx and will run on 256 Intel Xeon processors at 3.0 GHz. The cluster will eventually be housed at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, Calif., and is powered by InfiniBand adapters supplied by Mellanox and Intel Xeon processors from Linux Networx.

The cluster, scheduled to be delivered to Sandia this week, will initially be used for InfiniBand software stack validation and hardware testing, and ultimately will be available for the lab’s internal research and development.


Sandia National Laboratories’ World Wide Web home page is located at http://www.sandia.gov. Sandia news releases, news tips, science photo gallery, and periodicals can be found at the News and Events button.

Sandia National Laboratories
A Department of Energy National Laboratory
Managed and Operated by Sandia Corporation
ALBUQUERQUE, NM LIVERMORE, CA
MEDIA RELATIONS DEPARTMENT MS 0165
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87185-0165
PHONE: 505-844-8066; FAX: 505-844-0645

Mike Janes | Sandia
Further information:
http://www.sandia.gov/
http://www.sandia.gov/news-center/news-releases/2003/comp-soft-math/infiniband-cluster.html

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Defining the backbone of future mobile internet access
21.07.2017 | IHP - Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik

nachricht Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation
20.07.2017 | Brown University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>