Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Making sure the internet delivers

08.07.2008
European researchers have developed affordable test suites that businesses can use to check whether their software will work with the next-generation internet.

Internet applications across the globe are currently being re-engineered in anticipation of the transition to Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) from version 4 over the next three to four years. But before companies can make their IPv6 products commercially available, they will have to thoroughly test performance, standards-compatibility and interoperability.

The IP protocol, or standard, allows internet users to use different software applications and technologies when accessing the network. While plenty of commercial software already exists to test complex telecom protocols, these are often proprietary and all are expensive. For example, a GSM test system can cost about €2 million.

The researchers on the EU-funded Go4IT project have developed software suites and services that dramatically lower the cost of such testing for Europe’s businesses by providing IPv6 test suites available for free from the project’s website site.

Other test software developments
In addition to the IP test suites, the researchers have proposed new Testing and Test Control Notation-3 (TTCN-3) specifications for IPv6 compatible Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) type servers.

DHCP is a protocol that automates the assignment of IP addresses and other parameters to networked devices.

TTCN-3 is a computer language developed to test telecommunications software. The specification has received the backing of major commercial companies, including Ericsson and Nokia.

Go4IT’s TTCN-3 test suites will also be useful to a range of other industry sectors, such as car manufacturing.

The Go4IT project team’s work has won the interest of government test centres in China, the US and India, which also face the challenges of IPv6 transition.

In a further initiative, the Go4IT team has established a global open source community devoted to the development of TTCN-3 tests. The community includes researchers at universities in Inner Mongolia and Uruguay.

Encouraging the transition
By working as an open source community, the team has accelerated the development and acceptance of TTCN-3. Robust, easy-to-use and free testing suites, in turn, encourage the transition to IPv6.

The open source approach to TTCN-3 development allows small and medium sized enterprises and academics to easily participate in the development of the standard without facing prohibitive cost barriers.

“At the beginning of the project we saw that there was strong interest in TTCN testing and no free tools available,” says Go4IT project coordinator Franck Le Gall. “Our open source components for TTCN-3 testing are just a starting point.”

The transition to IPv6 from IPv4 is necessary because the internet is running out of addresses, he says.

“Of course, as IPv6 was engineered after IPv4, some other improvements have been built in,” says Le Gall, who participated last year in Europe’s impact assessment of IPv6 and is a manager with European strategic management consultants, the inno group. “But the need for more address space is the one compelling reason for the transition.”

The move from IPv4’s 32-bit addressing system to IPv6’s 128-bit system provides for virtually unlimited IP addresses and a greater flexibility in addressing systems.

The internet community incorporated IPv4 after agreeing to the standard in 1981, before anyone even dreamed about the scale of today’s internet. IPv4 has a 32-bit addressing system, allowing the creation of almost 4.3 billion individual addresses.

By 1991, it was clear that 4.3 billion addresses would be insufficient for any global internet. By 1996, the standards setters designed the main components of IPv6 and started working on the challenges of implementation.

While preparation for the transition has taken a long time, more and more manufacturers are building IPv6 compatibility into the server equipment and software that handles global internet traffic.

Go4IT received funding from the EU's Sixth Framework Programme for research.

Christian Nielsen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esn.eu
http://cordis.europa.eu/ictresults

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano
20.10.2017 | Brown University

nachricht New software speeds origami structure designs
12.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>