Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Internet revolutioneras med Grid-teknologin

28.03.2008
First there was the Internet­and now the time is ripe for Grid, a new technology that will turn a regular PC into a sort of supercomputer. The World Wide Web was first developed at CERN, the European laboratory for high-energy physics in Geneva.

Physicists are also behind the development of Grid technology, now within the framework of the EU project KnowArc, with partners in seven countries. Lund University in Sweden is playing a key role. The first Grid software packages were developed there for full-scale operation. The technological coordination of KnowArc is now also centered there.

What got physicists interested in Grid technology is CERN's new particle accelerator, LHC. It will be producing enormous amounts of data that needs to be stored and processed. In the last few days the Swedish government minister in charge of research, Lars Leijonborg, visited CERN and announced that Sweden should invest in Grid technology and that the country will take the international lead in its development. In the research bill to be introduced this autumn, new funding will be allocated to what is being called "e-science." In other words, this commitment will not be made at the expense of other research.

The Internet revolutionized how we exchange information and thus stimulated the advent of digital technology in all aspects of life. Thanks to the Internet, masses of data can be transferred and made available. But this is not enough if data is also to be processed, in connection with scientific calculations, for instance.

Today's technology is based on the data and the resources needed to process it being in one and the same place. Grid technology strives to allow transparent collaboration in terms of processor power, storage space, and data-collection tools in the form of scientific instruments even though they may be distributed geographically. The user doesn't even need to know the location of the computing capacity and the data masses being used. This technology has scored major successes in recent years. Software solutions have been developed to support teamwork between applications on different computers. Theoretical models and trial configurations have gradually been replaced by practically functioning and efficient distributed computer infrastructures both within and between countries.

The technological development and coordination of KnowArc is directed by Balázs Kónya at the Department of Physics, Lund University. The local Lund group that works with Grid technology is directed by Oxana Smirnova, who says:

"The Internet can be likened to transport routes; the Grid net is both a transport route and a factory. To physicists, Grid technology will be necessary now that LHC will be producing tremendous amounts of data. Other sciences that also generate large amounts of data are waiting in the wings, including biomedicine, genetics, proteomics, and radio astronomy. But ultimately we hope that Grid technology will be of use to all computer users, just as the World Wide Web has been."

More information: http://www.knowarc.eu, http://www.nordugrid.org, http://www.ndgf.org, http://www.hep.lu.se , http://www.cern.ch For further comments, Oxana Smirnova can be reached at phone: +46 (0)46 222 76 99, e-mail Oxana.Smirnova@hep.lu.se

Göran Frankel | idw
Further information:
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions
24.05.2017 | Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institut für Bildgestützte Medizin

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Reptile vocalization is surprisingly flexible

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

EU research project DEMETER strives for innovation in enzyme production technology

30.05.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the ancestors of all complex life

29.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>