Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Networked Embedded System Middleware speeds up the development of innovative systems

20.01.2009
The Fraunhofer Institutes for Applied Information Technology FIT and Secure Information Technology SIT demonstrate the Hydra middleware at the GSMA Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, February 16-19, 2009.

The middleware, which has context awareness and security among its main features, assists the manufactures of intelligent environments and speeds up the development of innovative systems. Visit us in hall 1, booth G-49.

Today's cars, aircrafts, intelligent buildings and home cinema systems all rely on embedded systems for vital functions. Advanced solutions actually are networks of embedded systems, mostly including devices from several different manufacturers. For this type of environment, the European Hydra project develops a "Networked Embedded System Middleware for Heterogeneous Physical Devices", which will help manufacturers and system integrators in combining and connecting devices that can be networked easily and work together in cost-effective and flexible solutions.

"A main issue in the Hydra project is networking a broad range of heterogeneous devices", Dr. Markus Eisenhauer from Fraunhofer FIT, the project's coordinator, explains. "The middleware makes it easy for developers to integrate additional devices and sensors into a distributed infrastructure. And it helps them take care of privacy and security requirements."

Hydra supports several operating systems and programming languages. Thanks to its flexibility, Hydra can be used in a broad range of applications, e. g., hospitals, airports and large-scale production facilities. Here, security and privacy have long been major issues. Hence, the concepts for minimizing information exchange and the mechanisms for secure communication, developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Secure Information Technology SIT, are significant features of the Hydra middleware.

The demo of the Hydra middleware at the GSMA Mobile World Congress consists of two different scenarios. First, a sensor-equipped midget-building that sends short messages to inform about a technical defect. This demo includes a situation where a sensor detects humidity inside the house's heating system and alerts the inhabitant by sending a message to their mobile phone in case she is not at home. In the next step, an order for an emergency repair request is sent to a service company, including a limited-validity electronic key for the building.

Second, a mobile health assistant is being developed showing a conceptual healthcare assistance system. It consists of a personalized device for patients under supervision at home that reminds them of important activities inside their personalized healthcare-plan. Another part of the demonstrator shows a mobile application running on a secure server. A physician and a mobile healthcare service can access different parts of that application by authenticating themselves with a smartcard. Depending on the access right, different information about the patient's current status is available. Additionally the physician has the opportunity to change the medication, prescribe measures and to send messages to the patient in order to give advice. Alternatively, instead of visiting the patient himself, a healthcare service can be assigned to look after the supervised patient.

Contact:

Alex Deeg
pr@fit.fraunhofer.de
Phone: +49 2241 14-2208

Alex Deeg | Fraunhofer Gesellschaft
Further information:
http://www.fit.fraunhofer.de
http://www.hydramiddleware.eu
http://www.sit.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Supercomputing the emergence of material behavior
18.05.2018 | University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

nachricht Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss
18.05.2018 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

Im Focus: Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing...

Im Focus: Light-induced superconductivity under high pressure

A team of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg investigated optically-induced superconductivity in the alkali-doped fulleride K3C60under high external pressures. This study allowed, on one hand, to uniquely assess the nature of the transient state as a superconducting phase. In addition, it unveiled the possibility to induce superconductivity in K3C60 at temperatures far above the -170 degrees Celsius hypothesized previously, and rather all the way to room temperature. The paper by Cantaluppi et al has been published in Nature Physics.

Unlike ordinary metals, superconductors have the unique capability of transporting electrical currents without any loss. Nowadays, their technological...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>