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Finnish experts to manage international agile software standardisation committee

07.10.2008
The technical standard developer IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) has chosen VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland to act as leader of an international agile software methods standardisation committee.

The committee will prepare recommendations on the application of agile methods in software acquisitions. Agile software development methods have revolutionised the software industry, and its principles are applied to the design and development of a variety of systems ranging from gaming applications to critical safety systems.

"VTT has studied agile methods since 2002 and its research results and European cooperation networks were enough to convince the IEEE. The standardisation work must be done quickly due to the pressing global interest in the methods. The IEEE is expecting a complete proposal on the recommended practices before the summer of 2009," says Research Professor Pekka Abrahamsson of VTT.

Agile methods combine a business- and customer-centred approach, and are based on short cycles, making the daily cooperation among developers even closer. Companies worldwide have accepted and implemented agile method principles. Evidence on companies having actually improved the quality of their systems and reduced their development costs has been obtained in Finland and abroad.

European companies well represented on the standardisation committee

For several years, Finnish and other European companies have been forerunners in the implementation of agile methods. Experts at Philips, ABB, Nokia, Nokia Siemens Networks, F-Secure, Reaktor Innovations and EB (Elektrobit) have been invited to join the standardisation committee, which will include experts from all around the world. The European participants come from a project known as FLEXI, which develops agile methods solutions for comprehensive global product development projects. In Finland, the project is funded in Finland by the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation, Tekes.

The Agile Finland Association and the FLEXI project will arrange a conference called Scandinavian Agile Conference in Helsinki on 29 October 2008, where experts will demonstrate the implementation of agile methods in various application environments. Furthermore, Research Professor Pekka Abrahamsson of VTT, the chairman of the standardisation committee, will introduce the objectives of and schedule for the standardisation project.

For further information, please contact:

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Research Professor Pekka Abrahamsson
Tel. +358 (0)20 722 2160
pekka.abrahamsson@vtt.fi
Further information on VTT:
Senior Vice President
Olli Ernvall
Tel. +358 20 722 6747
olli.ernvall@vtt.fi
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is the biggest contract research organization in Northern Europe. VTT provides high-end technology solutions and innovation services. From its wide knowledge base, VTT can combine different technologies, create new innovations and a substantial range of world-class technologies and applied research services, thus improving its clients' competitiveness and competence. Through its international scientific and technology network, VTT can produce information, upgrade technology knowledge and create business intelligence and value added to its stakeholders.

Press Office | alfa
Further information:
http://www.vtt.fi/?lang=en

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