Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bulwarks with Brains: Automatic Alarms

18.01.2011
Siemens is researching a monitoring technology that detects damage to levees at an early stage.

The researchers expect that with the help of sensors it will be possible to monitor the stability of the protective walls, with measurements accurate to within one meter.


On the basis of the measurements, self-controlling software can then forecast dangerous situations before they happen, making it possible to implement measures in good time. The systems is currently being field-tested at Livedijk in Eemshaven, the Netherlands. Siemens Corporate Technology in Russia is developing the technology together with partners for the UrbanFlood research project funded by the European Commission, as the research magazine "Pictures of the Future" reports.

Worldwide there are 136 coastal cities with populations of over one million that rely on the protection of dikes and levees. The pressure on these protective barriers is mounting because the climate change tends to cause the sea level to rise, and gives us good reason to expect more frequent storms. Until now, levees have been secured by either building them higher or reinforcing them, but this only buys time. Another strategy is the analysis of levees to identify sections that are at risk of being breached. “Smart bulwarks” could even predict fractures or the impact of flooding before they have a chance to happen.

For the levee monitoring the Siemens experts are using software designed for the monitoring of production facilities and providing it with new parameters. They determine these parameters from measurements taken at test levees and dikes that were intentionally destroyed using different methods, including by eroding the back side of a dike. This is what led to the disaster of the North Sea flood of 1953, for instance. Another test involves simulating the effects of water that bores a tunnel through the levee, which was one of the reasons for the devastating flooding in New Orleans. Now the software in use at Livedijk is learning to correctly interpret the data measured by the sensors under real conditions. In order to incorporate seasonal influences such as precipitation and wind directions in the analysis, this field test is being conducted for two years.

Other project partners are working on alarm notification options, for example via all mobile phones or navigation devices registered in the region at risk. In a next step, the researchers will equip levee and dike sections in Amsterdam and Saint Petersburg with the early warning system and monitor critical changes by means of an Internet-based software platform. In the long term they want to connect all levees and dikes worldwide to this platform and thus create a global monitoring system.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation
20.07.2017 | Brown University

nachricht Holograms taken to new dimension
19.07.2017 | University of Utah

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>