Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Even seaweeds get sunburned

22.08.2008
Researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute on Spitsbergen investigate the reaction of seaweeds to increased ultraviolet radiation

It is red, it burns and itches: a sunburn on our skin. However, too much sun is not only bad for humans. Many plants react sensitively to an increased dose of ultraviolet radiation, too. Yet they are dependent on sunlight.

With the help of pigments absorbing solar energy and light, plants produce their vitally important building blocks by means of photosynthesis. However, this has its limits: too much sun means an over-abundance of energy and thus the destruction of the sensitive pigments. The result are black spots, pale leaves and rotten parts.

Since algae cannot apply sun lotion like we do, they develop their own strategies to protect from the sun: "A species of red algae, for instance, produces under increased ultraviolet radiation less red light-harvesting proteins, thus decreasing the absorption of radiation. The typical red colour of the alga fades and the plant gets white tips.," explains Prof. Dr. Christian Wiencke, marine biologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association. "The algae additionally produce substances which react similar to melanin in human skins: mycosporin amino acids (MAA)." Melanin absorbs ultraviolet radiation and thus protects the human skin - at the same time, it gives a natural suntan.

... more about:
»AWIPEV »Antarctic »ultraviolet radiation

The ozone layer usually absorbs the major part of the hard and harmful solar ultraviolet radiation of short wavelength. However, because of stratospheric ozone depletion, these dangerous rays increasingly penetrate to the earth's surface and therefore also to the seawater.

Extensive biological experiments are presently conducted on this complex of problems at the German French Research Base AWIPEV on Spitsbergen. "We examine the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation on algae and their protective mechanisms," says Wiencke. The ultraviolet radiation particularly harms the algae's photosynthesis and their hereditary material. These organisms usually react with a decreased rate of growth or a reduction of reproductive success.

The spores and germ cells of the algae which drift through the water as unicellular organisms are particularly sensitive. Even small ultraviolet doses are damaging and inhibit their germination. "Our investigations show that the distribution of certain species of brown algae is inhibited by the climate of ultraviolet radiation. The algae are displaced into deeper water layers if ultraviolet radiation increases."

The research conditions on Spitsbergen are optimal for Wiencke and his colleagues: "We want to observe the development of marine coastal ecosystems in the face of global climate change. Not only an increased ultraviolet radiation plays a decisive role, but also the water temperature which has been increased by the greenhouse effect. This increase in temperature can particularly be felt on Spitsbergen, in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic."

Notes for Editors
Please adress your contact person in the public relations department, Folke Mehrtens (phone: +49/471/4831-2007; email: Folke.Mehrtens@awi.de) in questions of availability of the scientists.

The Alfred Wegener Institute carries out research in the Arctic and Antarctic as well as in the high and mid latitude oceans. The institute coordinates German polar research and makes available to international science important infrastructure, e.g. the research icebreaker "Polarstern" and research stations in the Arctic and Antarctic. AWI is one of 15 research centres within the Helmholtz Association, Germany's largest scientific organization.

Dipl.-Ing. Margarete Pauls | idw
Further information:
http://www.awi.de

Further reports about: AWIPEV Antarctic ultraviolet radiation

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht When corals eat plastics
24.05.2018 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Powerful IT security for the car of the future – research alliance develops new approaches

The more electronics steer, accelerate and brake cars, the more important it is to protect them against cyber-attacks. That is why 15 partners from industry and academia will work together over the next three years on new approaches to IT security in self-driving cars. The joint project goes by the name Security For Connected, Autonomous Cars (SecForCARs) and has funding of €7.2 million from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Infineon is leading the project.

Vehicles already offer diverse communication interfaces and more and more automated functions, such as distance and lane-keeping assist systems. At the same...

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Flow probes from the 3D printer

25.05.2018 | Machine Engineering

Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found

25.05.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>