Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Salmon Found – Ocean Tracking Network Breakthrough

20.08.2008
For years scientists have struggled to understand the decline of Atlantic salmon and what happens to them once they reach the ocean. The Ocean Tracking Network, headquartered at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, has made a breakthrough discovery, learning where they go.

Atlantic salmon tagged with tiny acoustic transmitters crossed the 22 km line of acoustic receivers, deployed by the Ocean Tracking Network (OTN), in the waters off of Halifax, Nova Scotia.

The fish, tagged by The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in the Penobscot River in Maine, sent signals to the receivers, and information about their passage was then downloaded from the receivers to a Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) research vessel via modem.

“In Maine, traditional methods of restoring Atlantic salmon by stocking fish have not been very successful, with only 0.68 per cent returning,” says Mike Stokesbury, director of research for OTN, headquartered at Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia. “With the tagged salmon we can track more fish further into the ocean than ever before and get meaningful results,” he explains.

One hundred salmon were tagged in Maine USA with 9mm transmitters in the Penobscot River. About 30 per cent of their signals were picked up by OTN receivers deployed by DFO off Halifax. Each fish has an individual code and gives specific information about its activity such as survival rates, speed and migratory habits. The information has shown that while some salmon may die before reaching Halifax, many still survive.

The first downloads gave valuable information about when the salmon left the Penobscot River and estuaries. “We’re not sure where they go in-between, but we’re hoping to find that out,” says Mr. Stokesbury. “The salmon crossing the line is evidence that the network is working,” adds Peter Smith, a scientist at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO) and the DFO lead for the Halifax Line. Some tagged salmon may have not yet crossed the line while others may have gone beyond it, but they may be detected again when they cross the Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) line at Strait of Belle Isle, Labrador.

“Given the fact that we are looking for a fish that is still less than a foot long that could be anywhere in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean, finding them in such apparent concentrations hundreds of miles from Brewer, Maine is remarkable and very encouraging,” said John Kocik, who is leading the salmon tagging project with colleague James Hawkes at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Centre’s Maine Field Station in Orono, Maine. “Broad-scale ocean arrays such as the OTN Halifax Line are a great tool to examine the marine ecology of such an uncommon fish in a large marine environment.”

Institutions and organizations such as BIO, DFO, USGS, ASF, NOAA and Dalhousie University are all part of the OTN effort to determine what’s happening to the salmon stocks. The first detection on the Halifax Line was recorded May 18 from a salmon tagged in Nova Scotia’s Medway River by a Fisheries and Oceans Canada researcher at BIO. The Halifax line also recorded a salmon tagged by ASF researchers in the spring in the Magaguadavic River, a Canadian river near the Maine-New Brunswick border. This fish crossed the Bay of Fundy and passed Halifax, presumably on the way to feed off the coast of Greenland.

“Salmon are an iconic fish, but they’re becoming endangered and people want to know what’s happening to the population,” says Mr. Stokesbury. “This is the first step to finding out where in the ocean the salmon are dying and what’s causing the decline.”

Similar results are being seen by the OTN’s West Coast partner in the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) project, of the Census of Marine Life. In addition to salmon, OTN researchers around the world and as far away as Australia are tagging marine life, from squid to turtles, with transmitters in an effort to finally provide ocean scientists around the world with the most comprehensive information about our oceans and marine life. Information about the OTN can be found at oceantrackingnetwork.org.

Billy Comeau | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.dal.ca
http://www.oceantrackingnetwork.org
http://www.bio.gc.ca/Welcome-e.html

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Making Oceans Plastic Free - Project tackles the problem of plastic pollution in the oceans
31.05.2017 | Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenforschung (ZMT)

nachricht Nitrogen Oxides Emissions: Traffic Dramatically Underestimated as Major Polluter
31.05.2017 | Universität Innsbruck

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>