Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Oceans 2025 - harnessing marine research for the future

11.01.2007
Oceans 2025 is a new research programme funded by the Natural Environment Research Council to deliver key strategic scientific goals. It is Designed by and implemented through seven leading UK marine centres addressing at a national scale, the challenges of a changing marine environment.

We live on a rapidly changing planet. By 2025 - just one generation away - our activities are expected to have a major impact on our oceans, which could cause changes affecting millions of people across the world. For example, it is predicted that by 2025 our demand for natural resources will have increased by at least a third and sea levels will have risen by 10-15 cm. A forecast 30% decrease in Arctic sea-ice extent will radically change ecosystems and accelerate high latitude climate change.

Oceans 2025 will increase our understanding of the size, nature and impacts of these changes and address some of the most fundamental issues in marine science. The coordinated approach from the marine centres, with cooperation and input from other government agencies and departments, will improve our knowledge of how our seas behave and how they are changing, and what that might mean not just for our oceans, but for society. Oceans 2025 will be critical to developing sustainable solutions for the management of marine resources for future generations.

Oceans 2025 will receive approximately £120 million from NERC over 5 years. The strategic nature of the programme will enhance the research capabilities and facilities available for marine science and Oceans 2025’s new Strategic Ocean Funding Initiative opens up funds for universities and other partners to bid for.

Professor Sir Howard Dalton, Chief Scientific Advisor to Defra, Chair of the Inter-Agency Committee for Marine Science & Technology and NERC Council Member welcomes the new co-ordinated approach: "Through NERC bringing a huge swathe of strategic marine science into a single 'Oceans 2025' programme, and designing it with UK policy needs in mind, the UK is much better positioned to use ocean research findings to protect and sustainably manage and develop our seas. Government departments and agencies must rise to the challenge of working closely with Oceans 2025 as it evolves, to ensure that this tremendous opportunity is taken”.

In a collective statement, the Directors of the seven participating marine centres said, “Knowledge of the oceans is crucial to tackling some of society’s most pressing concerns including climate change, acidification of our seas, and the sustainable use of food and energy resources from the sea. Opening up unexplored areas of the deep ocean also holds many opportunities for the future. Tackling these challenges requires that we work together to bring all our skills and resources to bear. We believe that through Oceans 2025 the UK will be able to strengthen even further its very strong record in national and international collaboration in marine science”

Reaching agreement on a coordinated, co-operative research programme of the scale and complexity of Oceans 2025 is a very important step. It develops the cross disciplinary partnership required to study and find solutions to the very practical and pressing issues of oceanic change.

Marion O'Sullivan | alfa
Further information:
http://www.oceans2025.org/oceans2025/oceans2025a.pdf
http://www.nerc.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

20.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>