Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Laughing Gas, Forests, Coastal Regions and Global Warming

11.09.2006
Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils.

Forest ecosystems may produce large volumes of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas, which affects the atmosphere's chemical and radiative properties. Yet, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient. This study investigates the quantitative and qualitative relationships between nitrogen-cycling and N2O production in European forests.

The authors conclude that changes in forest composition in response to land use activities and global change may have serious implications for regional budgets of greenhouse gases. It also became clear that accelerated nitrogen inputs predicted for forest ecosystems in Europe may lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions from forest ecosystems.

Read article: http://www.biogeosciences.net/3/135/2006/bg-3-135-2006.html

Bacterial carbon sources in coastal sediments: a cross-system analysis based on stable isotope data of biomarkers.

Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive regions in the world ocean. Because of the ample nutrient supplies, the coastal zone accounts for about 20% of oceanic primary production — despite its small geographic extent. Local organic producers span from phytoplankton to bottom-dwelling algae to seagrasses and mangroves. Because of the high rates of sediment accumulation, among other factors, a comparatively large percentage of this new organic matter survives early decay and is buried into the geologic record. Coastal regions also receive large inputs of organic material reworked and transported from surrounding regions by strong currents, including contributions from rivers that drain adjacent land areas. Through the combined effects of high production, large inputs of reworked material, and efficient sequestration, a vast majority of the world’s organic carbon burial occurs in these marginal marine settings.

As the dominant site of oceanic organic carbon burial, the coastal zone factors prominently in most models for short- and long-term carbon cycling and, correspondingly, in scientists’ estimates for CO2 variation in the atmosphere on a variety of time scales. In this paper, Bouillon and Boschker explore this complex organic reservoir through carbon isotope analysis of the many constituents, including large plant fragments and lipid biomarkers that are chemically extracted from the sediments and fingerprint bacterial sources.

Using this approach the authors explored which of the organic components bacteria most easily degrade and thus which have the potential for burial and removal from at least the short-term carbon cycle. Importantly, the authors compared the carbon isotope properties of bacterial biomarkers from a wide range of coastal settings and concluded that the microbes are feeding on a diverse assortment of organic constituents. In fact, at most sites where organic matter is readily available, bacteria show little selectivity in the compounds they decompose.

In light of the previous consensus that such materials should show widely varying biodegradability, this result will certainly raise questions, fuel future work, and ultimately refine our understanding of how carbon flows through its global biogeochemical cycle and impacts the composition of the atmosphere.

Read article: http://www.biogeosciences.net/3/175/2006/bg-3-175-2006.html

Dick van der Wateren | alfa
Further information:
http://www.egu-media.net/
http://www.landforms.org

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Upcycling 'fast fashion' to reduce waste and pollution
03.04.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA examines newly formed Tropical Depression 3W in 3-D

26.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

New High-Performance Center Translational Medical Engineering

26.04.2017 | Health and Medicine

NASA's Fermi catches gamma-ray flashes from tropical storms

25.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>