Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Laughing Gas, Forests, Coastal Regions and Global Warming

11.09.2006
Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils.

Forest ecosystems may produce large volumes of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas, which affects the atmosphere's chemical and radiative properties. Yet, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient. This study investigates the quantitative and qualitative relationships between nitrogen-cycling and N2O production in European forests.

The authors conclude that changes in forest composition in response to land use activities and global change may have serious implications for regional budgets of greenhouse gases. It also became clear that accelerated nitrogen inputs predicted for forest ecosystems in Europe may lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions from forest ecosystems.

Read article: http://www.biogeosciences.net/3/135/2006/bg-3-135-2006.html

Bacterial carbon sources in coastal sediments: a cross-system analysis based on stable isotope data of biomarkers.

Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive regions in the world ocean. Because of the ample nutrient supplies, the coastal zone accounts for about 20% of oceanic primary production — despite its small geographic extent. Local organic producers span from phytoplankton to bottom-dwelling algae to seagrasses and mangroves. Because of the high rates of sediment accumulation, among other factors, a comparatively large percentage of this new organic matter survives early decay and is buried into the geologic record. Coastal regions also receive large inputs of organic material reworked and transported from surrounding regions by strong currents, including contributions from rivers that drain adjacent land areas. Through the combined effects of high production, large inputs of reworked material, and efficient sequestration, a vast majority of the world’s organic carbon burial occurs in these marginal marine settings.

As the dominant site of oceanic organic carbon burial, the coastal zone factors prominently in most models for short- and long-term carbon cycling and, correspondingly, in scientists’ estimates for CO2 variation in the atmosphere on a variety of time scales. In this paper, Bouillon and Boschker explore this complex organic reservoir through carbon isotope analysis of the many constituents, including large plant fragments and lipid biomarkers that are chemically extracted from the sediments and fingerprint bacterial sources.

Using this approach the authors explored which of the organic components bacteria most easily degrade and thus which have the potential for burial and removal from at least the short-term carbon cycle. Importantly, the authors compared the carbon isotope properties of bacterial biomarkers from a wide range of coastal settings and concluded that the microbes are feeding on a diverse assortment of organic constituents. In fact, at most sites where organic matter is readily available, bacteria show little selectivity in the compounds they decompose.

In light of the previous consensus that such materials should show widely varying biodegradability, this result will certainly raise questions, fuel future work, and ultimately refine our understanding of how carbon flows through its global biogeochemical cycle and impacts the composition of the atmosphere.

Read article: http://www.biogeosciences.net/3/175/2006/bg-3-175-2006.html

Dick van der Wateren | alfa
Further information:
http://www.egu-media.net/
http://www.landforms.org

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dead trees are alive with fungi
10.01.2018 | Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ)

nachricht Management of mountain meadows influences resilience to climate extremes
10.01.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

White graphene makes ceramics multifunctional

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Breaking bad metals with neutrons

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

ISFH-CalTeC is “designated test centre” for the confirmation of solar cell world records

16.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>