Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Reallising the potential of renewable resources wins Queen’s Award for the University of York

18.11.2005


A research centre at the University of York dedicated to realising the potential of plant-based renewable resources to make products needed by society, has been awarded one of The Queen’s Anniversary Prizes for Higher and Further Education.



The Royal accolade for CNAP (Centre for Novel Agricultural Products) announced at St James’s Palace on Thursday 17 November is the second to be conferred on the University in less than 10 years. It was previously awarded to the University in 1996 for the excellence of its work in Computer Science.

Introduced following the 40th Anniversary of the Queen’s reign in 1992, the prizes rank alongside the Queen’s Awards for Industry. They are given biennially for "work of exceptional quality and of broad benefit either nationally or internationally."


CNAP, which is part of the University’s Department of Biology, works with the natural world to find solutions to problems facing our society. Plants capture solar energy and use it to make a vast range of products in a sustainable way. This ability is much needed by a world facing the depletion of finite fossil reserves and the increasing costs of oil and petrochemicals. CNAP’s six Professors work with some 70 researchers and support staff to develop a range of research programmes building on the capacity of plants and microbes to make useful products.

Founded six years ago, the research centre has already established international recognition for its achievements, the quality and creativity of its research and its commitment to communicate science to the public.

CNAP’s founder and Director, Professor Dianna Bowles, said "The award of a Queens Anniversary Prize after just six years of existence is a great honour and credit to all of those who have helped to establish CNAP as a vibrant environment, committed to using science to benefit society. Increasing our knowledge of plants and the natural world provides a real opportunity to develop sustainable solutions to many of the problems facing us."

The University’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Brian Cantor said: "The spectacular success of CNAP is testimony to the breadth of its research, its close interactions with the public and its focus on realising the potential of renewable resources. Fossil fuel reserves are finite and it is essential that society finds new sustainable alternatives.

"The fact that this is the University’s second Queen’s Anniversary Prize – the first being for our work in Computer Science - reflects the all-round excellence of the University’s research and teaching, and its commitment to engaging with the public on many levels."

| alfa
Further information:
http://www.york.ac.uk/admin/presspr/pressreleases/qap2005.htm

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How does the loss of species alter ecosystems?
18.05.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Excess diesel emissions bring global health & environmental impacts
16.05.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>