Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Quieter jet engines - and kinder to the environment

24.02.2005


The jet airliners of the future will be significantly quieter and more environmentally friendly with the help of engineers at The University of Nottingham.



Researchers have been awarded £830,000 (€1.2m) to explore new design methods that could reduce the noise of jet engines while at the same time cutting the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) they release into the atmosphere. They will play a key part in a new research project called VITAL — which stands for EnVIronmenTALly Friendly Aero Engine.

A team at The University of Nottingham will join a prestigious research programme bringing together the best of European aircraft engine expertise. Of 16 European universities involved — from Sweden, Germany, Austria, France, Italy and the UK — the Nottingham team has won the biggest slice of European Commission funding devoted to universities. Professor Tom Hyde, head of the School of Mechanical, Materials & Manufacturing Engineering, said: "This is a major new development for the research groups in the School and recognises our internationally-leading reputation in aeroengine technology."


VITAL is a four-year programme involving a consortium of 53 partners including all major European engine manufacturers, Airbus and leading European universities. It focuses on the low-pressure parts of the engine, evaluating new engine designs including counter-rotating fans, lightened fans, highly-loaded turbines and turbines with fewer blades. The weight reduction will enable the development of very high bypass ratio engines that reduce noise by between 5dB and 8dB while also decreasing CO2 emissions.

Nottingham’s researchers, who are all from the School of Mechanical, Materials & Manufacturing Engineering, will be working on three major projects with a budget of £830,000 (€1.2m). This is more than the combined awards of all the other three UK universities involved. In order to achieve VITAL’s noise reduction targets, the main low-pressure drive shaft must transmit a higher torque without increasing the size of the shaft or the weight of the engine. The target for Nottingham’s researchers is a 50% increase. Dr Ed Williams, who will be leading this part of the programme, said: "This cannot be achieved with existing technology, so we will be developing new multi-alloy designs and exploring the use of metal matrix composites."

The casing of the engine is its backbone, transferring the thrust from the engine to the aircraft. Nottingham will be developing new automated fabrication techniques for these complex structural components, which are made from titanium alloys. Dr Phil Webb, an expert in robotic welding, said: "These techniques will lead to a 15% weight reduction and a 30% lead time reduction in development and production." Many parts of the casing have to operate at high temperatures and structural integrity is of paramount concern to the designer. Prof Adib Becker said, "We will be developing new methods of predicting the life of these structures using advanced computer modelling of combined creep and fatigue mechanisms."

The total budget for the VITAL programme is €90m, including €50m in funding from the European Commission.

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

nachricht World Water Day 2017: It doesn’t Always Have to Be Drinking Water – Using Wastewater as a Resource
17.03.2017 | ISOE - Institut für sozial-ökologische Forschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>