Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Quieter jet engines - and kinder to the environment

24.02.2005


The jet airliners of the future will be significantly quieter and more environmentally friendly with the help of engineers at The University of Nottingham.



Researchers have been awarded £830,000 (€1.2m) to explore new design methods that could reduce the noise of jet engines while at the same time cutting the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) they release into the atmosphere. They will play a key part in a new research project called VITAL — which stands for EnVIronmenTALly Friendly Aero Engine.

A team at The University of Nottingham will join a prestigious research programme bringing together the best of European aircraft engine expertise. Of 16 European universities involved — from Sweden, Germany, Austria, France, Italy and the UK — the Nottingham team has won the biggest slice of European Commission funding devoted to universities. Professor Tom Hyde, head of the School of Mechanical, Materials & Manufacturing Engineering, said: "This is a major new development for the research groups in the School and recognises our internationally-leading reputation in aeroengine technology."


VITAL is a four-year programme involving a consortium of 53 partners including all major European engine manufacturers, Airbus and leading European universities. It focuses on the low-pressure parts of the engine, evaluating new engine designs including counter-rotating fans, lightened fans, highly-loaded turbines and turbines with fewer blades. The weight reduction will enable the development of very high bypass ratio engines that reduce noise by between 5dB and 8dB while also decreasing CO2 emissions.

Nottingham’s researchers, who are all from the School of Mechanical, Materials & Manufacturing Engineering, will be working on three major projects with a budget of £830,000 (€1.2m). This is more than the combined awards of all the other three UK universities involved. In order to achieve VITAL’s noise reduction targets, the main low-pressure drive shaft must transmit a higher torque without increasing the size of the shaft or the weight of the engine. The target for Nottingham’s researchers is a 50% increase. Dr Ed Williams, who will be leading this part of the programme, said: "This cannot be achieved with existing technology, so we will be developing new multi-alloy designs and exploring the use of metal matrix composites."

The casing of the engine is its backbone, transferring the thrust from the engine to the aircraft. Nottingham will be developing new automated fabrication techniques for these complex structural components, which are made from titanium alloys. Dr Phil Webb, an expert in robotic welding, said: "These techniques will lead to a 15% weight reduction and a 30% lead time reduction in development and production." Many parts of the casing have to operate at high temperatures and structural integrity is of paramount concern to the designer. Prof Adib Becker said, "We will be developing new methods of predicting the life of these structures using advanced computer modelling of combined creep and fatigue mechanisms."

The total budget for the VITAL programme is €90m, including €50m in funding from the European Commission.

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria – an evolutionary advantage?

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers pave the way for ionotronic nanodevices

23.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>