Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists called on to help protect coral reefs

25.06.2004


The International Society for Reef Studies has launched an ambitious programme to communicate the results of scientific research in order to improve policies and practices impacting on coral reef conservation around the world. The ISRS was founded in 1980 by international marine scientists to promote the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge on coral reefs, both living and fossil.
To help build more effective management policies for the world’s endangered reef ecosystems, ISRS scientists are developing a series of briefing papers to summarize important research relating to critical conservation issues.According to ISRS president Dr. Nicholas Polunin of the Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne in the United Kingdom: "These papers will present an objective and rigorous presentation of coral reef science as related to current issues in the management, use and conservation of the world’s reef resources."

The papers are targeted to a wider audience, including advocacy groups that can benefit from a synthesis of available scientific and technical information on local challenges in coral reef use and protection.Each will present the consensus expertise of some 2000 ISRS members worldwide with lifetimes of experience in all aspects of reef science. The aim is to present new information on critical issues that determine the future of coral reefs as well as the countries and cultures that depend on them.


At least four papers will be prepared annually, with topics proposed by ISRS members. They will be released via the ISRS website (www.fit.edu/isrs), and distributed to advocacy groups. The goal is to increase the scientific contribution to policy formulation.

Although the Society has previously avoided taking positions on specific developments or projects impacting reefs, there is overwhelming membership support for a more proactive role in communicating scientific findings to a broader audience. "We should be promoting important scientific information applied to important management and conservation issues," Dr. Polunin said."These briefing papers are quite different from our current publications."

The ISRS offers research fellowships and produces a peer-reviewed science journal as well as a research newsletter. The Darwin Award for fundamental contributions to reef science is presented every four years at the International Coral Reef Symposium.

The decision to produce ISRS briefing papers began with a call for help from a scientist in the Dominican Republic five years ago. In opposing the destruction of a reef to make way for a container port, the Society realized the importance of having thorough research summariesavailable to address conservation issues.

The ISRS was able to update a World Bank technical paper on harbour development by demonstrating how recent research had established new tolerance levels for corals. The new findings showed the potential devastation this proposed project would have caused.

The ISRS seeks to guide organizations such as the World Bank to avoid vague policies that do not clearly articulate the sensitivity of reefs to development. Reefs are particularly threatened by sedimentation from channel dredging, and other changes in nearshore water quality. The first four ISRS briefing papers will be presented at the 10th International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan beginning June27.

Dr Nick Polunin | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/marine

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How does the loss of species alter ecosystems?
18.05.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Excess diesel emissions bring global health & environmental impacts
16.05.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>