Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Can carbon sequestration solve global warming?

17.02.2003


The U.S. Government is spending millions of dollars to research the feasibility of stuffing carbon dioxide into coal seams and fields of briny water deep beneath the Earth. But, a scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting argues that the government isn’t thinking big enough in its plans to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.



Dissatisfied with the long-term potential of most current technologies for carbon sequestration, Klaus Lackner, Ewing-Worzel Professor of Geophysics at Columbia University, has designs for new power plants that would capture carbon dioxide before it leaves the facility, as well as for "synthetic trees" that would pluck carbon from the air, mix it with magnesium silicate, and store the carbon in the "rocks" that would result from the chemical interaction between the elements.

"Injecting carbon underground is a short-term solution," Lackner said. "The oil industry has done this with 20 million tons a year in West Texas, but that is not the scale we’re talking about here. We need to find a way to put away 20 billion tons." The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated that worldwide carbon dioxide emissions could more than triple over the next 100 years, from 7.4 billion tons of carbon per year in 1997 to approximately 20 billion tons per year by 2100. Lackner argued that large-scale carbon sequestration would allow the continued use of carbon-based fuels during the time needed to develop alternative sources of energy.


Encouraged by preliminary reports indicating the feasibility of carbon sequestration in coal seams and deep saline reservoirs, the U.S. Department of Energy recently announced it will fund public-private ventures to explore the capture of carbon, but researchers say there are considerable barriers to be overcome before the technology can be widely implemented. Injecting carbon into coal seams, for example, would force millions of gallons of salty water to the Earth’s surface, substantially greater amounts than the briny water produced during recovery of natural gas.

"This is not a trivial problem," said Curt White, Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area Leader at the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA, who will report on new findings regarding the physical and chemical phenomena that take place when carbon dioxide is injected into coal seams, and discuss the projected storage capacity of coal seams.

White will detail some of the technological obstacles to performing sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal beds, as well as parallel efforts to identify and recover the methane gas that is found in some of those sites. The valuable gas offers hope that the cost of capturing carbon can be covered.

Water disposal is a challenge because high concentrations of salts and other dissolved solids can be toxic to some organisms, White said. "Development of technologies to properly dispose of huge amounts of produced water is a problem area that needs further research." White and his colleagues are studying surveys conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to determine which coal seams in the United States might contain the most methane. The researchers are also exploring the long-term impact of pumping carbon into coal seams and brine fields.

"We now have a much better understanding of what we think is going to happen," White said. "I think that with the proper research and the right resources, the problem areas can be overcome."

The capture of carbon will not become routine, however, until steps are taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to Howard Herzog, principal research engineer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Energy and the Environment.

"Unless the economic incentives are in place, the technology is not going to go anywhere," said Herzog, who studies the economics of carbon sequestration. "Right now, the price of emitting carbons is almost free. If it goes up to about $100 per ton of carbon produced, you’d begin to see some significant scale of capture and storage."


Monica Amarelo | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aaas.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Malaysia's unique freshwater mussels in danger
27.09.2016 | The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

nachricht How to detect water contamination in situ?
22.09.2016 | Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-Ever 3D Printed Excavator Project Advances Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing R&D

Heavy construction machinery is the focus of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s latest advance in additive manufacturing research. With industry partners and university students, ORNL researchers are designing and producing the world’s first 3D printed excavator, a prototype that will leverage large-scale AM technologies and explore the feasibility of printing with metal alloys.

Increasing the size and speed of metal-based 3D printing techniques, using low-cost alloys like steel and aluminum, could create new industrial applications...

Im Focus: New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of light metals.
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart have now developed two new process variants that will considerably expand the areas of application for friction stir welding.
Technologie-Lizenz-Büro (TLB) GmbH supports the University of Stuttgart in patenting and marketing its innovations.

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of...

Im Focus: First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source

Optical quantum computers can revolutionize computer technology. A team of researchers led by scientists from Münster University and KIT now succeeded in putting a quantum optical experimental set-up onto a chip. In doing so, they have met one of the requirements for making it possible to use photonic circuits for optical quantum computers.

Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow’s computer technology – whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast...

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Paper – Panacea Green Infrastructure?

30.09.2016 | Event News

HLF: From an experiment to an establishment

29.09.2016 | Event News

European Health Forum Gastein 2016 kicks off today

28.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

First-Ever 3D Printed Excavator Project Advances Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing R&D

30.09.2016 | Materials Sciences

New Technique for Finding Weakness in Earth’s Crust

30.09.2016 | Earth Sciences

Cells migrate collectively by intermittent bursts of activity

30.09.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>