Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Modelling To Develop European Sand Dredging Guidelines

07.08.2002


Computer predictions of the effects of commercial sea-sand dredging on coastal erosion, produced by an international team headed by Dr Alan Davies of the University of Wales, Bangor`s School of Ocean Sciences, will play a key role in developing new European Guidelines for siting commercial sand dredging activities.



Increased demand for North Sea sand is anticipated, both for use as beach and sand dune nourishment and to meet demand for sand from large-scale European construction projects. Sand extraction can exacerbate coastal erosion if dredging activities are not properly sited.

Now, coastal oceanographers and engineers from 17 European leading institutes in & European countries have embarked on a major three year EU funded project, ‘SandPit` to assess what effects sand dredging may have on the sea bed ecosystems and surrounding coastlines and to develop European guidelines for sand dredging based on the optimum size, sea depth and distance from shore of any large scale commercial sand mining operation.


The SandPit project will assess the recovery time scales for the ecosystem surrounding dredging activities, and will gauge the critical depth at which sand mining has no measurable effect on the shoreline. This will be done by dredging a full-size in the North Sea. The pit will be closely monitored to measure what happens in the immediate vicinity once the sand is extracted, to see how the ecosystem recovers and to measure any changes to the adjacent coastline. These measurements will be compared to the predications currently available, and existing computer models will be improved as necessary.

Dr Alan Davies of the School of Ocean Sciences, a coastal oceanographer with more than 20 years` experience in the physical processes of sand movement, will lead the modelling group in SandPit. The group will produce computer predictions of how waves and currents along the shoreline in any one set of circumstances might be affected by dredging and how these changes will, in turn, affect the shoreline. Model improvements will be made using field data obtained during the project, starting with experiments in the North Sea this autumn.

"Sand is transported in the water column, but the amount transported depends on variables such as the particle size of the sand, on the depth at which the dredging takes place, on currents, and in shallower waters, on wave patterns. Dredging itself, by changing the shape of the sea bed, can affect the wave size and this can have consequent effects, including coastal erosion in some situations," explains Davies.

Current government guidelines regarding the volume and siting of dredging activities varies from country to country and are often based on information extrapolated from small-scale models. The aim of SandPit is to help towards putting future guidelines on a stronger scientific base.

Dr Alan Davies | alfa
Further information:
http://sandpit.wldelft.nl/mainpage/mainpage.htm

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht Understanding animal social networks can aid wildlife conservation
23.06.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement

26.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Smooth propagation of spin waves using gold

26.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

26.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>