Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mountaintop Mining Pollution Has Distinct Isotopic Fingerprint

16.08.2013
Three elements commonly found at elevated levels in an Appalachian river polluted by runoff from mountaintop coal mining have distinctive chemistries that can be traced back to their source, according to a Duke University-led study.

The distinctive chemistries of sulfur, carbon and strontium provide scientists with new, more accurate ways to track pollution from mountaintop mining sites and to distinguish it from contamination from other sources.

"Essentially, we found that these elements have unique isotopic fingerprints, meaning we can use them as diagnostic tools to quantify mountaintop mining's relative contribution to contamination in a watershed," said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment.

The newly identified tracers will be especially useful in watersheds with more than one source of potential contamination, he said. "Because they allow us to distinguish if contaminants are coming from natural sources, fracking and shale gas development, coal mining, coal ash disposal, or other causes."

Vengosh and his team's findings were published today in the online edition of the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The researchers measured the chemical and isotopic compositions of water samples collected monthly from 23 locations along West Virginia's Upper Mud River and its tributaries between May and December 2012.

They found that the isotopic signatures of sulfur (in sulfate), carbon (in dissolved inorganic carbon) and strontium from water samples collected from tributaries adjacent to mountaintop mining sites are distinguishable from those collected from unaffected upstream waters. They also found that the strontium isotope ratio is a sensitive tracer for selenium contamination, one of the major pollutants of mountaintop mining.

In mountaintop mining, companies use explosives and heavy machinery to clear away surface rocks and extract shallow deposits of high-quality coal. The companies typically dispose of the waste rock in adjacent valleys, where they bury existing headwater streams.

Previous studies by the Duke team and others have shown that runoff from these "valley fills" contains elevated levels of salts and selenium, a known fish toxin. The contamination can persist and accumulate in downstream waters for decades after active mining stops and the fills are reclaimed.

By conducting tests that simulated the natural leaching of contaminants from local rocks, Vengosh and his team were able to characterize the chemistry of the different geological formations that end up as waste rock in these fills. They found significant differences in strontium isotope ratios and selenium concentrations in streams flowing from reclaimed valley fills versus those flowing from active fills.

"This helps us further pinpoint the source of contamination by linking it directly to the type of rocks in the valley fills," Vengosh said.

The Upper Mud River flows through sparsely populated areas of southern West Virginia as a headwater stream. For about 10 kilometers, the river passes through the Hobet 21 surface mining complex, which has been active since the 1970s and is among the largest in the Appalachian coalfields.

Vengosh's co-authors were Ty Lindberg, Brittany Merola, Nathaniel Warner, Alissa White, Gary Dwyer and Richard Di Giulio, all of Duke's Nicholas School, and Laura Ruhl of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Ruhl received her Ph.D. from Duke in 2012.

Funding for the study came entirely from the Nicholas School of the Environment.

"The Isotopic Imprints of Mountaintop Mining Contaminants," Avner Vengosh, T. Ty Lindberg, Brittany R. Merola, Laura Ruhl, Nathaniel R. Warner, Alissa White, Gary S. Dwyer and Richard T. Di Giulio. Environmental Science & Technology, August 15, 2013 DOI: 10.1021/es4012959

Tim Lucas | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.duke.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>