Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Metal Immobilization using Plant and Poultry Waste Can Revive Soil Ecosystems

05.08.2009
New research highlighted in the latest issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality shows that even very contaminated shooting range soils can be remediated by using poultry waste and revegetating the site.

Shooting ranges are the major source of Pb contamination in Japan where over 600 sites are present mostly in remote locations.

Remediation of Pb-contaminated soils in a shooting range is generally more difficult than other types of natural and human-induced soil contaminations because the site is extensively contaminated with high levels of Pb, and therefore the local ecosystem has deteriorated.

For shooting range restoration, therefore, the site needs to be revegetated and metals need to be removed or immobilized to reduce toxicological risk in the environment.

In situ chemical immobilization is a practical remediation technology for metal-contaminated soils. A scientist at Mie University in Japan has demonstrated the use of poultry waste amendment in combination with plant growth to immobilize soil Pb and restore degraded vegetation in shooting range sites.

He measured Pb speciation of the soil using X-ray absorption spectroscopy at SPring-8, the world largest synchrotron radiation facility in Japan, and soil enzyme activity along with the changes in soil Pb immobilization. Results from the study were published in the July-August 2009 issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality. The research was also presented in Houston, TX at the Annual Meetings of the Soil Science Society of America in November 2008.

Lead speciation and enzyme activity were measured in shooting range soils treated with a grass plant and/or poultry waste in a large column setting. The research is targeted at the changes in Pb speciation along with enzyme activity and downward solute transport. As well as an understanding of metal solubility and transport, enzyme activity can become a more important factor when the goal of soil remediation program includes ecological restoration. The use of amendment with less adverse impacts on soil biological properties could be a prerequisite for a comprehensive and long-term restoration program of shooting range areas.

The study revealed that the amendment reduced the proportion of cerussite (PbCO3) and Pb-organic complexes and transformed them into a more geochemically stable species of chloropyromorphite [Pb5(PO4)3Cl] with 30 to 35% of the total Pb species. Applications of plant and amendment decreased downward Pb transport and increased activities of dehydrogenase and phosphatase in the surface soil.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/4/1420.

The Journal of Environmental Quality, http://jeq.scijournals.org is a peer-reviewed, international journal of environmental quality in natural and agricultural ecosystems published six times a year by the American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), and the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA). The Journal of Environmental Quality covers various aspects of anthropogenic impacts on the environment, including terrestrial, atmospheric, and aquatic systems.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive, international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, and founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science. It provides information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use.

SSSA supports its members by providing quality research-based publications, educational programs, certifications, and science policy initiatives via a Washington, DC, office. For more information, visit www.soils.org.

SSSA is the founding sponsor of an approximately 5,000-square foot exhibition, Dig It! The Secrets of Soil, opening July 19, 2008 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC.

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.soils.org

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Global threat to primates concerns us all
19.01.2017 | Deutsches Primatenzentrum GmbH - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung

nachricht Reducing household waste with less energy
18.01.2017 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>